The ex-wife of Alberto Nisman, the Argentine prosecutor who died under mysterious circumstances after accusing President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner of covering up a 1994 bombing, voiced criticism of the probe on Thursday. Nisman was found dead in his apartment in what was ruled a suicide.

Sandra Arroyo Salgado, the prosecutor's former wife, speaking at a congressional session organized by opposition groups, said the probe had become too politicized and is leaking too much information, calling for the case to be referred to an international commission, Deutsche Welle reported.

"Let's let justice take its course, don't continue politicizing a case in which so much is still unresolved,” she said. "In my own name and that of my daughters, I ask the national public defenders' office to consider ... the possibility of taking the case to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights."

Nisman, who was investigating Argentina’s response to the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center, was probing whether Iran's alleged involvement in the deal was covered up in exchange for favorable oil deals. He died one day before he was due to testify on the matter.

Argentine investigators say they’ve unearthed a draft of a warrant seeking the president’s arrest.

Investigators initially said the death was a suicide, before announcing later they were considering the possibility of a homicide. Nisman was reportedly found shot in the head with a pistol in his hand. Authorities say there was no sign of a struggle or intruders, ProPublica reported.

After Nisman’s death, Kirchner disbanded the intelligence service and announced plans to reform it with a new agency. She also said she was certain Nisman’s death was not a suicide, but that he was murdered by a conspiracy of former intelligence agents in order to discredit her, Reuters reported.

The other official implicated by the warrant is Foreign Minister Hector Timerman, who denied allegations that he discussed the possibility of absolving suspects in talks with Tehran. "I don’t have to prove my history. It is there for you to look at. I don’t need to prove that I support the defense of human rights. The same with my government. So it is ridiculous to think I put forward a deal, an economic deal, to forget about the case," he told The Washington Post in an interview on Tuesday.

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights is a human rights monitoring and advocacy group. It has previously investigated several high-profile incidents in the area, including a series of murders in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico and the suppression of democracy in Venezuela.