Artist Ron Miller Predicts Apocalypse In Photos, Says End Of The World, Death Of Solar System Is Imminent

on July 03 2013 10:16 AM

Apocalypse rendering Artist Ron Miller predicts the end of the world in recent artist renderings. Above: Miller's depiction of after a rogue planet disrupts Earth's orbit, moving it out of reach from the sun's rays.  Facebook

Massive earthquakes, solar flare, rising sea levels, nuclear destruction and meteor showers are just some of the ways artist Ron Miller predicts how the world will end in recently released artistic renderings.

Miller, who formerly served as an art director for the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air & Space Museum in Washington D.C., said the destruction of earth and our solar system is imminent. “From the end of civilization we go to the end of human life on Earth, then to the end of life of any kind, then to the destruction of the planet itself,” Miller told the Huffington Post, who predicted the solar system will die from causes ranging from a "giant sun" to the collision of galaxies. “The sun will become a dark, cold cinder and after many billions of years, will become the heat death of the entire universe,” he said.

See Ron Miller’s apocalypse photos here.

Miller’s renderings feature images of everything from volcanic ash covering the Mount Rushmore, the remains of London and Miami after massive flooding, to the aftermath of a tidal waves' destructions to Manhattan’s Statue of Liberty. While Miller is known for his science fiction art, his depictions are not a wide departure from ways in which scientists agree the world could meet its ultimate demise.

According to Live Science, nuclear war is a strong possibility after recent global nuclear war efforts from North Korea’s Kim Jong Un and the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists decision to move the Doomsday Clock at five minutes to midnight in Jan. Global warming, which Miller depicts by showing many of the North America’s most famous cities underwater, is another possible outcome. According to the report, many scientists agree that low-lying areas are at risk of being submerged and eventually become inhospitable.

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