Ghosts of a murderous past are giving acquitted alleged child killer Casey Anthony a hot chase. Daggers are out the world over for her, venomous fangs are waiting to have a go at her wherever she emerges during her post-release life.

However, she managed to fly under the radar on the first day after release. It is speculated that she would move to -- if not already done so -- Columbus, Ohio, her childhood hometown. According to the rumor grapevine, she could have gone to Los Angeles or Puerto Rico, instead.

Her parents, George and Cindy, who had declared their daughter will have no place in their family home, do not know her whereabouts. Their attorney had tried to get in touch with Casey's attorney Jose Baez to know her whereabouts. According to WSTP.com, George and Cindy got a message saying that Casey was safe.

Sympathizers and detractors alike say her life would have been safer inside prison than outside. I'm just gonna sit back and wait for someone to take justice into their own hands ... There are some crazy mad people in this world and I hope one of them gets her, said Ashley Wheeler of Orlando, according to the Telegraph.

More neighbors came out saying they thought it was grossly unfair for Casey Anthony to land any book deal that will make her an instant millionaire. “I wouldn't buy the book. I'll buy it and burn it maybe. She shouldn't get anything,” said Tiffany Dildine, according to WETM TV.

She may have got by with it for now, but karma has a way of finding us when we least expect it, Teresa Vinson-Bergesch wrote. So she will always be looking over her shoulder. I don't call that living just existing, Telegraph quoted another reader as saying.

Hours after an Orlando court found her not guilty of killing her daughter, she had landed a million-dollar book deal from Vivid Entertainment CEO Steve Hirsch. However, the deal was withdrawn subsequently, possibly taking a cue from the strong feelings people have against her.

But she would more likely than not get another lucrative offer for a tell-all book, possibly modeled after OJ Simpson’s memoir on his murder charge and subsequent acquittal.

Like OJ, Casey cannot be tried again, and that means a bold confession and a tell-all narration of the disappearance and death of Caylee Anthony cannot land Casey in any legal danger.