Nearly 40,000 people attended the Copenhagen Memorial Monday in Denmark to mourn a Jewish documentary filmmaker and a security guard were killed in a pair of attacks Saturday. The attacks were labeled terroristic, and the alleged killer, Omar el-Hussein, was shot to death by police.

Copenhagen Thousands hold candles at the memorial for the two men shot and killed in the Copenhagen terror attacks. Photo: Reuters

The memorial took place at Gunnar Nu Hansens Plads, which is near the sites of the shootings, The Copenhagen Post reported. Live music was performed, in addition to several guest speakers at the event, including Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt and French ambassador François Zimeray.

Copenhagen Thousands hold candles at the memorial for the two men shot and killed in Copenhagen. Photo: Reuters

It’s not believed the alleged killer was a part of a larger operation. “We have no indication at this stage that he was part of a cell,” Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt said, according to the New York Times. “But we will of course in the coming time evaluate our fight against radicalization. We are already doing a lot.”

Copenhagen Thousands hold candles at the memorial for the two men shot and killed in the Copenhagen terror attacks. Photo: Reuters

After the shooting, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called for Jewish people in Europe to immigrate to Israel. “This wave of terror attacks can be expected to continue, including anti-Semitic and murderous attacks. We say to the Jews, to our brothers and sisters, Israel is your home and that of every Jew. Israel is waiting for you with open arms,” he said, according to the The Guardian.

Copenhagen Thousands held vigil at the memorial for the two men shot and killed in the Copenhagen terror attacks. Photo: Reuters

But former French President François Hollande insisted there is a place for people of the Jewish faith in Europe, especially in France. “Jews have their place in Europe and, in particular, in France,” he said.

Copenhagen Flowers are placed in memory of the Copenhagen shooting victims. Photo: Reuters

But is Europe really safe? A Swedish cartoonist went into hiding after the attacks, Agence-France Presse reported. Lars Vilks was reportedly the target in the first of the Copenhagen attacks. He’s faced plenty of death threats in the past, but after the Charlie Hebdo tragedy and Copenhagen shooting, Vilks home in Hoeganaes, southern Sweden "is not a safe place. And he needs to be in a safe place,” police spokeswoman Ewa-Gun Westford told the AFP. "The attack seemed to be directed at him. Regardless, the security assessment is that he cannot be in his home," Westford said.

Vilks, 68, has been a target since he drew a cartoon about freedom of expression and it was published in a Swedish newspaper in 2007.

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