Moammar Gadhafi was buried in an unmarked desert grave at an unknown location early Tuesday morning, as the former Libyan dictator's death awaits investigation.

Libya's new leaders would not disclose the location of the grave, in fear of his supporters  turning it into a shrine.

A few relatives and officials were in attendance of the Islam ceremony, and a nephew of Gadhafi read a prayer for the dead before the burial, according to a Misrata military council official.

Gadhafi's body was buried along with the corpse of his son Mutassim Gaddafi and former defense minister Abubakr Yunes, after they spent four days in a commercial freezer in a warehouse area of Misrata and were exposed to public eyes, adding to the controversy raised by the international society. Graphic videos and photos of moments leading up to Gadhafi's death and his corpses have led to demand for an investigation of his death. 

If Colonel al-Gaddafi was killed after his capture, it would constitute a war crime and those responsible should be brought to justice, Claudio Cordone, Senior Director at Amnesty International, said.  Investigating whether or not his death was a war crime might be unpopular. However, the NTC must apply the same standards to all, affording justice even to those who categorically denied it to others.

Gadhafi's widow, Safiya, also demanded an investigation, according to Syrian-based Al-Rai TV station. I am proud of the bravery of my husband, Moammar Gadhafi, the holy warrior, and my sons who confronted the aggression of 40 countries over the past six months, she said.

 

Mustafa Abdel-Jalil, head of Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC), said that a committee was set up to investigate Gadhafi's death.

We have formed a committee to investigate how Gaddafi was killed during the clashes with his supporters while arresting him, Abdel-Jalil said in Benghazi.

All Libyans wanted to prosecute him over what he did to them, from executions to imprisonment, corruption, wasting their money. Those who have an interest in killing him before prosecuting him are those who had an active role with him.

Gadhafi was captured on Oct. 20 after he was found hiding in a drain pipe in the city of Sirte, and was allegedly killed in crossfire. Gadhafi died as he was taken to Misrata by the rebel fighters, but how he exactly died remains unknown. The government maintains that Gadhafi from two bullet wounds when loyalist fighters attacked the convoy carrying the captured dictator.

Speculations remain, however, that Gadhafi was executed by NTC fighters.

 

The death of Gadhafi marks the end of his 42-year tyrrany, and especially the civil war, or revolution, that began last February.

Interim leader Mustafa Abdul-Jalil declared on Sunday an end to the 8-month civil war. The transitional government is setting up the Islamic law as the basic source of legislation for the new democracy, Abdul-Jalil announced. Existing laws contradicting Islamic  Sharia law would be nullified, and polygamy would be legalized.

I would like to assure the international community that we as Libyans are moderate Muslims, said Abdul-Jalil.  

This revolution was looked after by God to achieve victory, he told the crowd at the declaration ceremony in the eastern city of Benghazi, where the uprising against Gadhafi was initiated. 

With the country now officially 'liberated, the NTC is expected to implement its two-year roadmap to democracy, which include the formation of an interim government within a month and elections for a constituent assembly to draft a new basic law held within eight months. Parliamentary and presidential elections would then be held within 20 months.

Adherence to Sharia law raised concerns among many Libyans, especially regarding women's rights. 

It's shocking and insulting to state, after thousands of Libyans have paid for freedom with their lives, that the priority of the new leadership is to allow men to marry in secret, Rim, 40, a Libyan feminist who requested anonymity, told AFP.

We did not slay Goliath so that we now live under the Inquisition. 

Libya's transition to democracy is going to be slow, if it happens at all, according to Ben Wedeman, a CNN senior international correspondent.

There is expected to be a lot of revenge, leading up to lawlessness, said Wedeman.

 

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