‘Harry Potter’ Movie Rumors: How Many J.K. Rowling Books Will Warner Bros. Spinoff Into Films?

on October 01 2013 9:23 AM

New "Harry Potter" Movie? Warner Bros. has reportedly trademarked more J.K. Rowling novel titles. Above: Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint and Emma Watson in "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" in 2001. The trio will reportedly not star in any of the upcoming spinoff films.  Facebook

Fans of the "Harry Potter" books mourned following the release of the final film adaption in 2011, but according to new reports, author J.K. Rowling’s fictional wizarding world will continue to live on on the silver screen in more ways than one.

According to a report from the entertainment gossip website Bleeding Cool, Warner Bros. has not only secured the rights to create a film based on Rowling’s 2001 short novel “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” they have also secured several other related trademarks. Allegedly, the studio behind the “Harry Potter” blockbuster franchise has trademarked Rowling's 2001 novel title “Quidditch Through The Ages” and the name of the story’s fictional author, Kennilworthy Whisp. Rowling’s 2007 book “The Tales of Beedle the Bard,” which includes a collection of magical fables and was included in the storyline of the final two “Harry Potter” films, was also reportedly trademarked.

While Warner Bros. has yet to confirm the claims, rumors of multiple “Harry Potter” films in the near future have recently begun to surface. Reports of a possible film about Quidditch, the fictional sport which involves the use of several different magical balls and broomsticks, is the most obvious to become a feature film after Bleeding Cool reported that Quidditch team names the Wimbourne Wasps, the Chudley Cannons and the Kenmare Kestrels, were also trademarked.

It was announced in September that Rowling would collaborating with the studio on the script for the feature film adaption of her novel, “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” a “prequel” of sort to the boy wizard, seven-book series. The 48-year-old British author announced the film would follow the story of the book’s “author,” a character named Newt Scamander, in a statement. “Newt's story will start in New York, 70 years before Harry's gets under way,” said Rowling, also calling the film an “expansion” of the wizarding world first seen in the “Harry Potter” series. Daniel Radcliffe has since confirmed he will not reprise his leading role in the film.