For this Mother’s Day (reminder: one week from today, that is, Sunday, May 10), presidential candidate Hillary Clinton wants you to call your mother. In fact, she may do it for you.

In an email to supporters Sunday afternoon, the Clinton campaign announced its latest fundraising effort: an online contest to receive a call from Hillary Clinton herself this Mother’s Day.

“You're an important part of this campaign, and that means you're important to me. So on Mother's Day, I'd like to call the mom in your life -- someone who is special to you and helped you get there -- and say thank you," the email reads. 

Indeed, the email clarifies that the call does not need to be to your mother, specifically, but more of a motherly figure in the winner’s life.

The email directs supporters to an online sign-up page on the Clinton campaign’s official website. The contest is open to U.S. residents ages 18 and older. Anyone can enter by typing in their email and zip code. The page then directs you to a donation page, which reads: “Now increase your odds -- chip in to be automatically entered again for another chance to win.”

However, the official rules states that no contribution is necessary and will not improve the chances of winning. The sign-up page is open from Sunday to May 8. Five winners will be selected and will receive a call from Clinton as well as a bumper sticker.

Efforts like this contrast Clinton's 2008 presidential run, where she was criticized as not appearing likable or approachable. But in her current campaign, Clinton has been emphasizing her sincerity as a woman and mother. Indeed, her minibio on Twitter reads, "Wife, mom, grandma, women+kids advocate, FLOTUS, Senator, SecState, hair icon, pantsuit aficionado, 2016 presidential candidate." The Atlantic's Peter Beinart described Clinton's new strategy as playing "Grandmother in Chief."

In the email, Clinton also wrote about her role as a mother and the influence her own mother had on her: "I've been a mother for more than 35 years now, and I'm still not sure how my mother did it. She didn't always have an easy life, but she managed to remain strong and kind and always remember everyone who helped her get through the tough times. She passed those lessons on to me, and in turn, I was able to pass them on to my daughter."

Clinton's previous campaign in 2008 also struggled to compete with the digital forwardness of Barack Obama's. The Mother's Day call campaign also highlights Clinton's new, aggressive approach on social media and fundraising online. Since emailing supporters about the contest earlier this afternoon, the Clinton campaign has promoted the Mother's Day call twice on Twitter and on Facebook.