Kim Dotcom's Second Mansion and More Assets Seized

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2012 is set to become annus horribilis for Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom. New Zealand government's Official Assignee, on Thursday, seized more assets of the Internet tycoon, including a car, jewellery, jetskis and a $4.3 million mansion.

According to Guy Sayers of the Official Assignee, the court order was passed on Feb. 1 following the earlier order for seizure of assets when Dotcom was arrested last month.

It included a further vehicle, some items of jewellery, jetskis and a property that borders what is called the Dotcom mansion, Sayers told NZ Newswire.

The home seized this time borders the Dotcom Mansion, where Dotcom and his family lived until the time of his arrest. After Dotcom's arrest, his wife Mona, who will give birth to twins in April, and their three other children were living in the smaller house.

Dotcom has bought the 2.16 hectare home in Coatesville, north of Auckland, after he was refused permission to buy the $30 million Dotcom mansion by the Overseas Investment Office, for he had failed the good character test.

Meanwhile, Sayers said Dotcom's family will not be rendered homeless.

Certainly no one is going to be evicted, Sayers told New Zealand Herald. We'll set up a property inspections to make sure there's no damage, but other than that, the family can still enjoy it.

Megaupload, one of the world's leading file-sharing and online storage sites, was shut down by the U.S. authority in January. Dotcom and other top executives of Megaupload were arrested and charged with racketeering, copyright infringement and money laundering.

Currently, the defendants remain in custody in New Zealand, waiting for an extradition hearing, which has been scheduled for Feb. 22.

Start the slideshow to find out how luxuriously Dotcom lived.

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