Pennsylvania Flooding Captured in Photos

 @LauraMatt on September 09 2011 11:52 AM

The swollen Susquehanna River is expected to reach about 26.5 feet by Friday evening, after reaching about 25 feet in Harrisburg overnight, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported.

Forecasters at the National Weather Service had predicted that the river would crest around 29 feet.

Water already began spilling over the banks in low-lying areas in the state. More than 1,200 National Guard troops are on flood duty in the state.

Officials have confirmed five deaths so far from the flash flooding to include an 8-year-old Lancaster County boy who was swept off his feet by rushing water.

The flooding is occuring because of remnants from Tropical Storm Lee that have been lingering in the northeast since Wednesday.

Take a look at the rescue efforts and flood damage below.

 

The swollen Susquehanna River is seen in Wilkes-Barre

The swollen Susquehanna River is seen in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania September 8, 2011. Relentless rain spawned by the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee caused major flooding in the U.S. East on Thursday, forcing the evacuation of 65,000 people from the northeastern Pennsylvania city of Wilkes-Barre and swamping homes and businesses from Maryland to New England. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

A streetlight is submerged by floodwaters from Susquehanna River in Kingston

A streetlight is submerged by floodwaters from the Susquehanna River in Kingston, Pennsylvania September 8, 2011. Relentless rain spawned by the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee caused major flooding in the eastern United States on Thursday, forcing the evacuation of about 130,000 people in Pennsylvania, New York and Maryland and swamping homes and businesses all the way up to New England. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

Sandbags are seen atop a flood wall on the Susquehanna River in Kingston

Sandbags are seen atop a flood wall on the Susquehanna River in Kingston, Pennsylvania September 8, 2011. Relentless rain spawned by the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee caused major flooding in the eastern United States on Thursday, forcing the evacuation of about 130,000 people in Pennsylvania, New York and Maryland and swamping homes and businesses all the way up to New England. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

A street sign is submerged in floodwaters from the Susquehanna River in West Pittston

A street sign is submerged in floodwaters from the Susquehanna River in West Pittston, Pennsylvania September 8, 2011. Relentless rain spawned by the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee caused major flooding in the eastern United States on Thursday, forcing the evacuation of about 130,000 people in Pennsylvania, New York and Maryland and swamping homes and businesses all the way up to New England. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

U.S. National Guard troops rescue David Rowlands and Linda Rowlands from floodwaters from the Susquehanna River in West Pittston

U.S. National Guard troops rescue David and Linda Rowlands (C) from floodwaters from the Susquehanna River in West Pittston, Pennsylvania September 9, 2011. Relentless rain caused catastrophic flooding in the eastern United States on Thursday, killing at least five people and forcing the evacuation of more than 130,000 more in three states. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

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U.S. National Guard troops rescue David Rowlands and his dog Cupcake from floodwaters from the Susquehanna River in West Pittston

U.S. National Guard troops rescue David Rowlands and his dog Cupcake from floodwaters from the Susquehanna River in West Pittston, Pennsylvania September 9, 2011. Relentless rain caused catastrophic flooding in the eastern United States on Thursday, killing at least five people and forcing the evacuation of more than 130,000 more in three states. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

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