U.S. Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson said Saturday that more should be done to help refugees, and while the United States should do more to resolve the crisis, accepting thousands of refugees into the country would do nothing, ABC News reported. Often criticized for a lack of foreign policy experience, Carson visited a Syrian refugee camp in Jordan, meeting with medical and humanitarian workers as well as government officials.

“We must find a political end to this conflict. Millions of refugees have now been waiting for years for the end of the war to come in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey," Carson told ABC News. "Some are giving up hope that they will ever be able to return to the country. We must keep their hope alive."

Carson criticized the Obama administration for not doing enough to resolve the crisis. “In the coming days I will offer what I believe are real solutions to the problems created in part by the Obama Clinton administration's failed policies," Carson said in the statement.

Carson said displaced Syrians should be hosted by countries in the Middle East while other countries send aid to the hosting countries. Countries that have become overwhelmed by refugees, Jordan among them, have said they are burdened unfairly with the refugees and other countries have not done enough.

Syrians have been flooding into Europe to escape their war-torn homeland. Fears over Syrians crossing borders have increased since the Paris terror attacks Nov. 13 – for which the Islamic State group, also known as ISIS, has claimed responsibility -- with some concerned militants would try to sneak into the U.S., CBS News reported.

Carson’s trip Saturday comes after he made comments supporting background checks on refugees trying to come into the United States. Carson has also compared refugees leaving Syria to rabid dogs, Reuters reported.


Carson said he would not support a U.S. president of the Muslim faith with which many Syrian refugees, the Washington Post reported. He argued Islam may not be consistent with the principles of the U.S. Constitution.