Radio personality Rush Limbaugh is still seeing the consequences after calling Georgetown University of Law Student, Sandra Fluke, a slut and a prostitute. After nine big advertisers pulled their sponsorship from the radio personality's show, two radio stations have actually parted ways as well.

WBEC in Pittsfield, Massachusetts and KPUA in Hilo, Hawaii have pulled the plug on Limbaugh after his words against Fluke's advocacy of insurance coverage of birth control crossed a line for them. Even after an apology, many like WBEC's General Manager Peter Barry feel that this time he's taken it too far.

KPUA echoed WBEC's line of standards. The most recent incident has crossed a line of decency and a standard that we expect of programming on KPUA whether it is locally produced or a syndicated program like the Rush Limbaugh Show, said KPUA president Chris Leonard in a statement. ...Regardless of one's political views on the issue being discussed, we feel the delivery was degrading and the continued comments over several days to be egregious. As a result, we are discontinuing the Rush Limbaugh program on KPUA effective immediately.

Limbaugh's apology on his website stating that he did not mean a personal attack on Ms. Fluke, seemed to have no effect on advertisers as well as these radio stations as more continue to drop the talk-show host. I acted too much like the leftists who despise me, said Limbaugh. I descended to their level, using names and exaggerations. It's what we've come to expect from them, but it's way beneath me.

Yesterday Carbonite, Citrix, Go To Meeting, Legal Zoom, ProFlowers, Quicken Loans, Sleep Number and Sleep Train all dropped advertising from the show. AOL and Stamps.com have followed suit as well, with a Stamps.com spokesman stating that Limbaugh's comments do not align with our company values.

Even after losing advertisers, Limbaugh was quick to remark, They have profited handsomely from reaching you. Now they have decided they don't want to reach you anymore and we will replace them with advertisers who do. But if more radio stations continue to drop Limbaugh, there might not be a need for replacement advertisers.