Sir Alec Guinness, who played Obi Wan Kenobi in the original three "Star Wars" films, wasn't the biggest fan of the first installment in the series, "Star Wars: A New Hope." That's according to a letter current "Star Wars" actor Oscar Isaac read at a London performance, apparently penned by Guinness while filming the 1977 movie, the Telegraph reported.

"Can't say I'm enjoying the film," Guinness wrote about the movie. Issac played pilot Poe Dameron in the latest installment of the space epic, 2015's massive box office hit "Star Wars: The Force Awakens." He was reading the note from Guinness at an event at London's Freemasons' Hall called Letters Live, in which literary correspondence is read to a live audience. The letter from Guinness was to his friend Anne Kauffman.

"New rubbish dialogue reaches me every other day on wages of pink paper, and none of it makes my character clear or even bearable," Guinness wrote. He was also critical of actor Harrison Ford, who played Han Solo, calling him a "languid young man."


In fact, Guinness could hardly remember Ford's name, telling Kauffman he was working with "Mark Hamill and Tennyson (that can't be right) Ford. Ellison? No! Well a rangy, languid man who is probably intelligent and amusing."

The event at which Isaac read the letter also featured appearances and readings from actors Benedict Cumberbatch and Jude Law. Guinness might not have been a fan of the dialogue while working on the film, but he would later get nominated for an Oscar as best supporting actor for his role. This was not the first time the letter from the Obi Wan Kenobi actor surfaced. It appeared in a 2003 biography of the actor. Guinness was hesitant to even take the role, according to a letter he sent to Kauffman before filming. He got the name of director George Lucas wrong and was wary of taking on a science fiction film.

"I have been offered a movie (20th Cent. Fox) which I may accept, if they come up with proper money. London and N. Africa, starting in mid-March. Science fiction — which gives me pause — but is to be directed by Paul [sic] Lucas who did 'American Graffiti,' which makes me feel I should. Big part. Fairy-tale rubbish but could be interesting perhaps," Guinness wrote in the 1975 letter, according to Business Insider.