Who Are Jerad And Amanda Miller? Las Vegas Shooting Suspects Spoke Of 'Doing The Next Columbine' [PHOTO]

Jerad and Amanda Miller
Las Vegas shooting suspects Jerad and Amanda Miller. Facebook

Jerad and Amanda Miller, the Las Vegas shooters who allegedly killed two police officers at a pizzeria and a bystander at a Wal-Mart, had plans about “doing the next Columbine” and sympathized with Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, neighbors of the pair said.

Brandon Moore, who lived in the same apartment complex as the shooters, said the man and woman weren’t shy about their plans to commit violence.

"They were handing out white-power propaganda and were talking about doing the next Columbine," Moore told the Las Vegas Sun.

The suspects reportedly bragged about going to Bundy’s ranch, where a standoff between the federal government and armed Bundy supporters came to a head in April, with the government accused Bundy of grazing cattle on federal land without a permit.

“Yap, yap, yap. They were always running their mouths,” said neighbor Susan Hale, who told the Sun about the couple’s bragging about being in Bunkerville, Nevada, during the standoff.

While authorities hadn’t publicly released the names of the suspects as of early Monday afternoon, neighbors identified them as Jerad and Amanda Miller, according to Wonkette.

Oak Tree Apartments resident Sara Andrea told the Sun that the couple was known around Vegas for dressing as The Joker and Harley Quinn from the Batman comics. Amanda Miller's Facebook page had a photo of the couple dressed as the characters. And Jerad Miller's Facebook has an ominous message a day before the shooting: "The dawn of a new day. May all of our coming sacrifices be worth it," it read.

"No one associated [with them], but everyone knew these people," Andrea told the Sun.

The couple reportedly walked into a CiCi’s fast food pizza joint and yelled “this is the start of a revolution,” before opening fire on the officers, killing 41-year-old Alyn Beck and 31-year-old Igor Soldo. After taking the cops’ badges and bullets, they covered the officers with the Gadsden flag, a banner depicting a coiled snake and the words, “Don’t tread on Me,” a popular symbol from the American Revolution.

Investigators were probing whether the Millers owned white supremacist paraphernalia and that they planned to shoot police officers, as one neighbor suggested.

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