Ford (F) has issued a series of recalls for more than 1 million cars, trucks, and SUVs in North America over compliance and safety issues.

The first recall affects multiple 2020 vehicles that are equipped with a rearview camera that has an intermittent operational issue.

In the U.S., over 620,000 vehicles are impacted by the recall, with over 76,500 affected in Canada and over 4,300 recalled in Mexico.

In the affected vehicles, which include Explorers, F-150s, Mustangs, Transits, Super-Dutys, Expeditions, Escapes, Rangers, and Edges, there is insufficient electrical conductivity within the printed circuit board internal to the camera. This causes the rearview camera to intermittently display a blank or distorted image.

Vehicles recalled include:

  • 2020 Explorer SUVs built at the Chicago Assembly Plant from Nov. 16, 2019 to May 18, 2020.
  • 2020 F-150 pickup trucks built at the Dearborn Assembly Plant in Michigan from Oct. 26, 2019 to May 18, 2020, and Kansas City Assembly Plant in Missouri from Nov. 2, 2019 to May 18, 2020.
  • 2020 Mustang cars built at the Flat Rock Assembly Plant in Michigan from Nov. 18, 2019 to May 26, 2020.
  • 2020 Transit vans built at the Kansas City Assembly Plant from Oct. 28, 2019 to May 20, 2020.
  • 2020 Super Duty pickup trucks built at the Kentucky Truck Plant from Nov. 3, 2019 to May 18, 2020 and the Ohio Assembly Plant from Oct. 30, 2019 to May 18, 2020.
  • Expedition SUVs built at the Kentucky Truck Plant from Oct. 30, 2019 to June 22, 2020.
  • 2020 Escape SUVs built at the Louisville Assembly Plant in Kentucky from Nov. 5, 2019 to May 18, 2020.
  • 2020 Lincoln Corsair SUVs built at the Louisville Assembly Plant from Nov. 14, 2019 to May 18, 2020
  • 2020 Ranger pickup trucks built at the Michigan Assembly Plant from Dec. 9, 2019, to May 19, 2020
  • 2020 Edge SUV built at the Oakville Assembly Plant in Ontario, Canada, from Nov. 13, 2019, to May 26, 2020.
  • 2020 Lincoln MKX SUVs built at the Oakville Assembly Plant from Nov. 21, 2019, to May 26, 2020.
  • 2020 Nautilus SUVs built at the Oakville Assembly Plant from Nov. 21, 2019, to May 26, 2020.

To repair the rearview camera problem, Ford dealers will replace the camera. Ford said that customers will begin to receive recall notifications on Nov. 7.

In another recall, Ford’s Mustang cars are outfitted with a brake pedal bracket that could fracture during sudden stopping. This could cause the driver to lose primary braking capabilities, which could increase the risk of an accident.

The recall affects over 38,000 Mustangs in the U.S. and over 2,200 in Canada, and over 300 in Mexico. The impacted cars were built at Ford’s Flat Rock Assembly Plant from March 4, 2019 to Aug. 13, 2020.

Ford dealers will replace the brake pedal bracket assembly to remedy the problem.

The last recall from Ford affects its 2019 F-Series Super Duty pickup trucks – the F-250 and F-350 models, which may be equipped with front axles that contain a wheel end yoke that was not properly welded to the axle tube end.

In these trucks, the incorrectly welded attachment could cause steering issues that could impact the control of the vehicle, causing it to pull to the right or left, misaligning the steering wheel, or changing the steering sensitivity. This could affect the response of the vehicle to the driver’s input during a hard-braking event, increasing the risk of a crash, Ford said.

The recall affects over 9,600 trucks in the U.S., and over 960 in Canada. The impacted trucks were built at Ford’s Kentucky Truck Plant from Aug. 24, 2021 to Oct. 16, 2019.

To fix the safety issue, Ford dealers will replace the axle assembly if the weld was improperly located.

Ford said it is not aware of any reports of accidents or injuries related to any of the recalls.

As of Monday at 1:58 p.m. ET, shares of Ford were trading at $14.19, down 11 cents, or 0.80%.

The fifth generation of the Ford family are due to take their place on the automaker's board of directors The fifth generation of the Ford family are due to take their place on the automaker's board of directors Photo: GETTY / SCOTT OLSON