Two meat producers have recalled nearly 100,000 pounds of raw ground beef due to E. coli contamination. Both recalls were done in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

Swift Beef Company has recalled 99,260 pounds of raw ground beef products that were produced on Oct. 24 for E. coli contamination. The affected ground beef products include:

  • Bulk Pallets of Swift Ground Beef 81/19 (81% lean) Fine Grind Combo, packaged in a 2,000-pound quality with the product code 42982.
  • Plastic wrapped chubs of Blue Ribbon Beef Ground Beef 81/19 (81% lean) Coarse Grind, packaged in 8 to 10-pound packages with the product code 42410.
  • Plastic wrapped chubs of Blue Ribbon Beef Ground Beef 93/07 (93% lean) Coarse Grind, packaged in 8 to 10-pound packages with the product code 42413
  • Plastic wrapped chubs of Blue Ribbon Beef Ground Beef 85/15 (85% lean) Coarse Grind, packaged in 8 to 10-pound packages with the product code 42415.
  • Plastic wrapped chubs of Blue Ribbon Beef Ground Beef 73/27 (73% lean) Coarse Grind, packaged in 8 to 10-pound packages with the product code 42510

All of the recalled ground beef from Swift Beef Company has an establishment number of EST. 628 inside the USDA mark of inspection. The beef products were shipped to retail and food service distributors, where they were further processed for institutional use in the states of California, Nevada, Utah, and Washington.

The FSIS discovered the issue on Nov. 15, during a sampling of the ground beef that tested positive for E.coli O157:H7. The FSIS determined that Swift Beef Company was the sole source of the ground beef products and made the recall on Nov. 16.

Consumers with questions about this recall should call JBS USA Consumer Hotline at 1-800-727-2333. The company has not received any reports of adverse reaction to consuming the recalled ground beef.

Majestic Meat Company has also recalled approximately 532 pounds of ground beef products that may also be contaminated with E. coli. The bulk ground beef, ground beef patties, and meatballs were produced by the company on Nov. 8.

The ground beef products has an establishment number of EST. 19915 inside the USDA mark of inspection. The ground beef was shipped to restaurants within Utah. A full list of products included in the recall can be found here.

The FSIS discovered the E. coli O157:H7 contamination when a sample of ground beef tested positive for the bacteria. There have been no reports of adverse reactions to consuming the recalled ground beef products.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Raymond Zaelit, the president at Majestic Meat Company, at 801-486-4904.

The FSIS has also set up a 24-hour virtual representative to answer any food safety questions. Ask Karen can be accessed at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. Consumer questions can also be directed to the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854). The hotline is available in English and Spanish from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST, Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day.

Consumers that are concerned about injury or illness from the contaminated ground beef should contact their health provider. E.coli can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea, and abdominal cramps that can last several days. Most people will recover in a week, but in some cases it could lead to kidney failure, especially in children under 5 and older adults. This is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. If you experience any of these symptoms, you are urged to see your medical physician.

The FSIS has urged consumers to prepare raw meat products properly and safely. Ground beef should be cooked to a temperature of 165 ° F.

Ground Beef Recall Two meat producers have recalled nearly 100,000 pounds of ground beef products due to E. coli contamination. Carlos Vasquez monitors ground beef as it passes through a machine that makes hamburger patties at a meat packing and distribution facility on June 24, 2008 in San Francisco, California. Photo: Getty Images/Justin Sullivan