Golfer Tiger Woods was seriously injured Tuesday in a single-car crash in California, according to a tweet from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.

Woods has "multiple" leg injuries, according to his agent, Mark Steinberg.

"He is currently in surgery and we thank you for your privacy and support," Steinberg told Golf Digest.

The Los Angeles County Fire Department reported Woods was in serious condition.

There is no current prognosis for the 45-year-old. Police called the crash a single-vehicle rollover and said it happened at the boundary between Rolling Hills Estates and Rancho Palos Verdes. 

Woods is recovering from back surgery performed last month to remove a disc fragment that was pinching a nerve. It is the fifth back procedure of his career. He had hoped to play in the Masters in April, but the five-time Masters champ said last weekend that it didn't seem likely.

His 15 major championships are second only to Jack Nicklaus' 18. Woods has won the PGA Championship four times, with three wins each at the U.S. and British opens. With 82 career PGA Tour wins, Woods is tied with Sam Snead for the most of all-time.

Another serious injury could be career-ending.

"Playing four rounds of competitive golf was very tough for Tiger Woods this late in his career," CNN sports reporter Andy Scholes said Tuesday. "He's in the ninth inning of his career at this point; 45 years old."

The PGA Tour issued a statement on the crash.

PGA Tour golfer Justin Thomas learned of the accident during a news conference at The Concession Golf Club in Bradenton, Florida.

He was in California for a two-day shoot with Golf Digest and GOLFTV. He was giving on-course lessons to celebrities including former NBA star Dwyane Wade and comedian/actor David Spade.

The vehicle driven by Tiger Woods lies on its side in Rancho Palos Verdes, California, on February 23, 2021, after his rollover accident The vehicle driven by Tiger Woods lies on its side in Rancho Palos Verdes, California, on February 23, 2021, after his rollover accident Photo: AFP / Patrick T. FALLON