Richard Marx made headlines Tuesday after he helped to tie down a violent passenger on a Korean Air flight. The pop singer and another male passenger stepped in after flight attendants failed to successfully gain control of the unnamed man. The singer called the Korean Air flight crew “ill-trained” for being unable to subdue the passenger.

Marx boasts a three-decade long career. He released his eighth and latest album titled Beautiful Goodbye in 2014. The 53-year-old can now add airplane hero to his lengthy resume.

Marx was sitting near the 34-year-old passenger, who became angry and violent after he drank two and a half glasses of whiskey, according to the Guardian. During the flight from Hanoi to Seoul, he pulled a flight attendant’s hair and continued to rage while other attendants attempted to tie him up with a rope.

Pictures posted by Marx’s wife, television host Daisy Fuentes, show a female flight attendant pointing a Taser at the man. Marx also posted numerous pictures to his official Facebook page, including one that showed the passenger pulling a flight attendant's hair.

“This went on for FOUR hrs. I feel horrible for the abuse the staff had to endure but no one was prepared for this. They never got control of him” Fuentes posted on Instagram. “They didn’t know how to use the Taser & they didn’t know how to secure the rope around him (he got loose from the rope restraints 3 times).”

Marx had some choice words for Korean Air following the incident.

“My wife and I are safe but one crew member and two passengers were injured. The all-female crew was clueless and not trained as to how to restrain this psycho,” Marx wrote on Facebook. “Korean Air should be sanctioned for not knowing how to handle a situation like this without passenger interference.”

It's not the first time Korean Air has had issues mid-flight. In 2014, former Korean Air executive vice president Heather Cho was accused of physically and verbally assaulting one of the flight attendants for serving her macadamia nuts in a bag instead of on a plate during a flight from New York to Seoul. Cho served almost five months in prison for the incident and was subsequently sued by the flight attendant.

“The flight crew responded to the situation according to the proper protocol,” Korean Air told the Korea Herald in response to Marx's comments. The airline defended its employees and said that the Taser was not deployed on purpose because it posed a risk to other passengers on the plane.

GettyImages-617917394 Richard Marx is shown with his wife, Daisy Fuentes, at an award ceremony in Beverly Hills, California, Oct. 24, 2016. Photo: Getty