BlackBerry A10 Specs, Pictures Reportedly Leak As Z10 Price Plummets [VIDEO]

Information about the BlackBerry A10 is leaking at the same time as a barrage of bad news for the company

  @tommylikeyt.halleck@ibtimes.com on July 16 2013 6:07 PM

An image revealing possible specifications for a “confidential” BlackBerry (NASDAQ:BBRY) device, rumored to be the upcoming A10, has been posted on a BlackBerry fan forum.

The image depicts the A10, also known as the Aristo and potentially a successor to the BlackBerry Z10, as containing a 1.7 GHz dual-core Qualcomm processor, 2 GB of RAM and a 5-inch OLED screen. IBTimes previously reported that the device would be considered a high-end flagship for the struggling Canadian manufacturer, and would see a release date sometime in the Fall (late November, according to some sources).

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The BlackBerry A10 will contain a 2,800 mAh battery if the slide is legitimate. This is significantly larger than the 1,800 mAh lithium ion battery found in the BlackBerry Z10. The BlackBerry A10 will run version 10.2 of BlackBerry’s BB10 operating system, according to the image.

The slide shows that the BlackBerry A10 will have a dual-core processor with a quad-core graphics processing unit. The GPU is vital to smooth animation of operating system software, and with the help of 2 GB of RAM, a high-powered GPU could help the BlackBerry A10 deftly tackle multiple tasks at once. Since most Qualcomm CPUs included in mobile phones these days are system-on-a-chips, or SoCs, it would not make sense for the BlackBerry A10 to have a quad-core GPU with a dual-core processor.

These "leaks" come at a rough time for BlackBerry, as the company’s stock has plummeted from $14.91 per share on June 26 to a close of $9.12 per share on Tuesday. Investors have not been pleased with the number of devices shipped by the company in the second quarter, which came to 2.7 million BB10 devices total. Prices of BlackBerry’s Z10 have also dropped from $199 with a new two-year contract to $49 at AT&T and Best Buy (NASDAQ:BBY), which some analysts have seen as a sign of weak sales.

A Vietnamese cell accessory maker leaked a video on Sunday with details about the BlackBerry A10, including video of the device being used. The video is embedded below, showing usage of what looks like the BlackBerry A10 at the 1:10 mark.

The video seems to show a similar device as the message board post, with both showing a black-bezeled touchscreen with a silver case. The coordinated image depicted in the slide and video could very well be the BlackBerry A10, and not a false mockup of the device. If the BlackBerry A10 is a five-inch long device, it will compete as a larger phone/tablet hybrid, or phablet, much like the upcoming Samsung Galaxy Note 3 and the rumored HTC One Max.

BlackBerry A10 Specifications per the CrackBerry forum post:

Processor: Dual core 1.7GHz Qualcomm NSN8960 Pro, Quad Core GPU

Radio: LTE/CDMA/HSPA+, LTE/HSPA+

Display: 5" OLED, HD/WXGA, 1280x720, 24-bit color, S-Stripe Pixel Arrangement, 295 PPI

Dimensions: 140.7 x 72 x 9.4mm (9.7 Verizon)

OS: BlackBerry OS version 10.2

Camera: 8.0MP Rear Camera with flash, IS, 5X 2.0MP Front Camera, IS 5X

Memory: 16GB + 2GB (RAM) + 64GB uSD (hot-swap)

Connectors: Micro USB, Micro HDMI Out

Sensors: Ambient Light, Proximity, Accelerometer, Gyroscope, Magnetometer, Altimeter

Wi-Fi: 802.11 a/b/g/n (4G Mobile Hotspot)

Battery: 2800 mAh integrated

Other: NFC, DLNA, Micro SIM

The BlackBerry A10 has not yet been officially announced by the company and lacks a release date. According the the slide released on CrackBerry's forums, the BlackBerry A10 could have a larger battery and be a couple of millimeters thicker than the iPhone 5 and Samsung Galaxy S4.

BlackBerry told the Wall Street Journal that the price cuts seen at U.S. retailers are part of the release cycle when a new device is coming out. However, Nomura Equity Research analyst Stuart Jeffrey told CNBC that price cuts for the BlackBerry Z10 before the announcement of the BlackBerry A10 seemed “unusually early.”

“It seems hard not to conclude there is excess inventory,” Jeffrey said, according to AllThingsD.

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