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Baltimore dream-rock duo Beach House released a new single into the cloud early Wednesday morning, March 7 through a tweet that simply read: Hello Again.

The 12:18 a.m. EST tweet led to the band's website where nothing more appeared than a black background with white serifed type, reading: Beach House | Bloom Myth and tools to embed or share the track. It appears below:

Just minutes after the song--a cut from the band's upcoming, Pitchfork-reported fourth LP, out May 15 on Sub Pop--appeared, critics already took to Twitter, declaiming the track as inferior to Victoria Legrand and Alex Scally's previous full length, Teenage Dream. Stereogum called the track lovely.  David Ehrlich called the song crazy / beautiful while others just kind of flipped out about it. Elsewhere, the F--king beautiful song gave some goosebumps while others think it's the best thing they've ever done and also fire. The ambivalance/neutral quotient was high while others felt the love. In general, off the bat, fans found the single provocative, one listener thanking Based God and another even calling it flawlessly beautiful and another saying he or she needed that. One fan's reaction was soul-affirming. Another said the band's 2010 album Teenage Dream still hadn't gotten over on them. Detractors were perennial detertractors. Joy could not be quelled. A Wedding Crashers reference made it to one listener's feed. One writer decided its EZ listening adult indie guitar sounds like a badly recorded steel drum while another just wanted to be taken there and yet a third found confirmation in identity there. Another reader tweeted at this writer strong affirmation on the song's power. The band started trending on Twitter around 1 a.m. EST even so much so the band reportedly, amicably disrupted software. At some point, a listener decided that was it for the rest of the year. Fans began gushing at some point. This person left it to tears.

While compiling the above list, this writer listened to all of Teenage Dream, following an initial listen of Myth and then after all that to Myth again. Conclusions? Not sure everyone would hear the immediate percussive upgrades--the off-the-bat brake drum, the full and natural toms, the confident, cycling progression--but there's certainly something fresh here, if only a glossed production and downplayed tonality. On Myth, Beach House sounds as illusory as ever, with that pleading drive making the band's tunes seem urgent and heartfelt at once. Not to further incentivize this, as both bands' albums are surely finished, but it seems only the dour and driving Lower Dens--off the basis of that band's immense Brains video--could be in the same arena as Beach House at all as far as laid-back and crafted pop goes in 2K12.

Readers: Y/N?