Spirit Airlines Mocks Obama-Schmidt Photo: 'Sometimes A Selfie Makes A Wifey Angry' [PHOTO]

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Spirit Airlines is at it again, riffing off a current event for one of its promotional ads, this time using the Obama selfie flap to good advantage.

While in South Africa to pay tribute to Nelson Mandela at the official memorial service last Tuesday, President Barack Obama captured a moment with British Prime Minister David Cameron and Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt, seated near him in the stands at FNB Stadium.

Taking selfies is a new trend, thanks to improved cameras on smartphones these days. Oxford Dictionary even named "selfie" the international word of the year 2013. In Obama’s case, the selfie was controversial in part because it happened at a memorial service and because two photos of the incident that popped up online seemed to show Michelle Obama annoyed at her husband's actions.

s Obama shared a laugh with Schmidt, who sat beside him, his wife, on the other side of him, looked irritated in a photo taken by Roberto Schmidt. In a second photo, which seems to have been taken after Obama spoke and snapped the selfie with the Danish prime minister, it is clear that the president and Michelle switched seats so he was no longer sitting next to Helle. People on social media immediately speculated that Michelle had forced her husband to switch seats with her to keep them from communicating during the service.

Now, Florida-based Spirit Airlines is poking fun at the incident. “Sometimes a selfie make a wife angry,” says the ad, featuring a black male snapping a photo with a blond woman. His black wife then pops up on the screen, visibly upset. “Make wifey happy with Spirit’s low fares,” the ad continues.

Just last month, the low-cost carrier had fun with another titillating current event. During the Rob Ford crack-smoking scandal, Spirit emailed customers an ad that said, “We’re not smoking crack. Fly to the Toronto area and other destinations from just $29.90.” The ad also showcased Ford’s large silhouette, enveloped in plumes of smoke. 

 

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