The U.S. government is adding more security at federal buildings after a Canadian soldier was killed outside the Canadian parliament last week, Politico reported. The U.S. government also amped up security as the country continued to receive threats from groups like the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Syria), Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said.

"I have directed the Federal Protective Service to enhance its presence and security at various U.S. government buildings in Washington, D.C., and other major cities and locations around the country," Johnson said.

"The reasons for this action are self-evident: The continued public calls by terrorist organizations for attacks on the homeland and elsewhere, including against law enforcement and other government officials, and the acts of violence targeted at government personnel and installations in Canada and elsewhere."

Johnson said the decision was "precautionary" and added the locations that have extra attention "will be continually re-evaluated."

Army Cpl. Nathan Cirillo was killed at the Canadian National War Monument in Ottawa after gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau opened fire. The alleged shooter, who recently converted to Islam, had a criminal history for drug trafficking in Montreal and robbery in Vancouver.

There is no evidence he worked with Islamic State militants, Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird said. He added he was “tremendously concerned about the number of Canadians who are radicalized and are fighting in Syria or Iraq. ... Reports suggest that well in excess of 100 Canadians have gone to fight jihad in the Middle East and that's a huge concern."

Zehaf-Bibeau was killed by House of Commons Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers, 58, who was touted as a national hero after he stopped the shooter, the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. reported.

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