A South Carolina dealership has increased its sales by offering a controversial promotion that it seems customers are flocking toward. The Ford (F) dealer is reportedly providing customers with a bible, an American flag, and a Smith & Wesson AR-15 with their vehicle purchase.

The dealer, Carolina Ford in Honea Path, South Carolina, used Facebook to promote its unusual giveaway and told WYFF, an NBC affiliate in Greenville, South Carolina, that one customer drove as far as two hours to receive the deal.

Derrick Hughes, the general manager at Carolina Ford, told the news outlet that sales are up with the idea that was shared on social media as a promotion that read “near and dear to our hearts: God Guns and America!"

The “God Guns and America” idea was born out the area’s strong interest in hunting and the use of ARs for wild hogs and coyotes based on it being lightweight easy to shoot, Hughes said. The dealership also reportedly wanted to give out AR-15s because most people in the region already own a shotgun or pistol.

While controversial to some, Hughes points out that the dealership is “not taking a political stance in any way shape or form. We are all country folk, God-fearing people. We are very patriotic people, believe in our country and salute our military.”

Customers can still get in on the deal, which runs through November at the Carolina dealership. Car buyers will leave with a bible and flag in hand but will receive a voucher for the AR with their purchase. All recipients of the promotion will go through a background check to receive the firearm.

“We are not forcing anyone to take the gun, Hughes told WYFF. “They can use the voucher for sporting equipment, fishing or archery equipment. They can also choose a different gun.”

Shares of Ford stock were up 0.63 percent as of 2:21 p.m. ET on Thursday. 

Moody's slashed the credit rating on Ford to junk status, citing the automaker's weaker financial outlook Moody's slashed the credit rating on Ford to junk status, citing the automaker's weaker financial outlook Photo: GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / JUSTIN SULLIVAN