NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) recently shared stunning photos of various places that they took from space. One of the photos shows the “Eye of the Sahara,” which many believe to be the site of the lost city of Atlantis.

Astronauts Christina Koch and Nick Hague recently treated their Twitter followers to beautiful photos of various places around the world taken from space. Through her account, Koch shared images of Australia, Iran, France and the U.S.

Despite being taken from space, Koch’s photos are clear and detailed enough to show the geographical features of the various places.

Hague, on the other hand, only showed one photo on his Twitter account. For his post, Hague decided to share a photo of the Richat Structure in the Sahara Desert. This is a slightly eroded elliptical dome with a diameter of around 25 miles.

When viewed from above, the Richat Structure shows the concentric circles around its center, which makes it look like a giant eye. As noted by Hague, the size of this structure, as well as its distinct appearance, makes it very easy to spot and even photograph from the ISS.

Interestingly, the Richat Structure or the “Eye of the Sahara” has been the center of conspiracy theories lately because some believe that it is the location of the lost city of Atlantis.

One of the believers of this theory is the YouTube user Jimmy who runs the Bright Insight channel. In a previous video, he claimed that Atlantis was established in the Richat Structure. He noted that the reason why it hasn’t been found yet is because many people believe the city is at the bottom of the ocean.

“Not only did the lost city of Atlantis exist but its true location has been hiding in plain sight for thousands of years, completely unnoticed,” he said in a video.

“We’ve been looking in all the wrong places for its location since everyone assumed it must be under the ocean somewhere such as the depths of the Atlantic Ocean or the Mediterranean Sea, which we can consider the most likely places for its existence,” he added.

Richat Structure The eye-catching "bullseye" of the Richat Structure adds interest to the barren Gres de Chinguetti Plateau in central Mauretania, northwest Africa. Photo: NASA/JSC