KEY POINTS

Back in 2013, Vine was introduced as this six-second looping video's app, and it exploded. Twitter launched Vine, and people embraced it. However, in 2017 it was discontinued. Now, Vine makes a return as Byte.

Vine’s successor Byte is officially launched, and it is up against industry champion – TikTok. Similar to Vine, Byte allows users to create six-second videos.

Dom Hofmann, the Vine co-founder, launched the app on Friday, Jan. 24, and users have started downloading the app to try it out. Business Insider reported that Byte still misses a few bells and whistles that can hamper its growth compared to TikTok.

In order to refine the user experience, Byte has started a community forum where users can share their problems related to the app. It also features tutorials and how-to articles.

However, users have been unable to find the link to share the videos on other platforms. The users are provided with a share button, but it gives out an exporting page and not the link. The videos are exported, but the app is unable to generate a link. Moreover, it is not possible to share profile links from the app. Users have been reporting the bugs and flaws in the community page for the app engineers to fix.

“Please let us share bytes without sending the video itself! It's so much faster to share a link, and the current system makes it hard to send bytes over services that may restrict sending files in some way like discord's 8mb file size limit, sending over text uses up cellular data or just having slow internet speeds,” a user wrote in the community platform of Byte.

“You should be able to press the share button and send a link to the Byte and have it embed in whatever you're sending it in. This also opens up allowing the recipient to open it and view the creator to like and/or follow.”

Byte is a promising app that can compete with TikTok in this content-driven webspace. However, it has to squash the bugs and fix the flaws.

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Back in 2013, Vine was introduced as this six-second looping video's app, and it exploded. Twitter launched Vine, and people embraced it. However, in 2017 it was discontinued. Now, Vine makes a return as Byte.

Vine’s successor Byte is officially launched, and it is up against industry champion – TikTok. Similar to Vine, Byte allows users to create six-second videos.

Dom Hofmann, the Vine co-founder, launched the app on Friday, Jan. 24, and users have started downloading the app to try it out. Business Insider reported that Byte still misses a few bells and whistles that can hamper its growth compared to TikTok.

In order to refine the user experience, Byte has started a community forum where users can share their problems related to the app. It also features tutorials and how-to articles.

However, users have been unable to find the link to share the videos on other platforms. The users are provided with a share button, but it gives out an exporting page and not the link. The videos are exported, but the app is unable to generate a link. Moreover, it is not possible to share profile links from the app. Users have been reporting the bugs and flaws in the community page for the app engineers to fix.

“Please let us share bytes without sending the video itself! It's so much faster to share a link, and the current system makes it hard to send bytes over services that may restrict sending files in some way like discord's 8mb file size limit, sending over text uses up cellular data or just having slow internet speeds,” a user wrote in the community platform of Byte.

“You should be able to press the share button and send a link to the Byte and have it embed in whatever you're sending it in. This also opens up allowing the recipient to open it and view the creator to like and/or follow.”

Byte is a promising app that can compete with TikTok in this content-driven webspace. However, it has to squash the bugs and fix the flaws.

Networks like Facebook, Twitter and TikTok currently work more like walled-off playgrounds, where posts are shared with friends within an existing framework Networks like Facebook, Twitter and TikTok currently work more like walled-off playgrounds, where posts are shared with friends within an existing framework Photo: AFP / Denis Charlet