Andrew Breitbart at CPAC 2012: I Don't Want to Be a Pundit [VIDEO]

 @sara_dover
on February 10 2012 8:39 PM
Andrew Breitbart at CPAC 2012
Conservative blogger and CPAC speaker Andrew Breitbart says he doesn't want to be a political pundit, but the media keeps treating him that way. Sara Dover

Conservative blogger Andrew Breitbart may have a lot of strong opinions, but he doesn't want to become a political pundit.

Breitbart stopped by the media press room at the Marriott Wardman Park hotel in Washington, D.C., shortly after giving a speech at CPAC 2012. He told the International Business Times he doesn't see himself as a conservative commentator, although the media treats him like one.

I was on CNN this morning, and they just wanted my opinion on stuff that was in the news, and I'm like, I don't want to be a pundit. I don't want to be a pundit, he said.

Breitbart said he would rather continue to focus on the cultural left from an anthropological point of view, including analysis of Hollywood, the media and the social aspects of the Occupy movement.

I don't think what's going on in my head right now is that important. I don't want people to be basing their opinions on it, he said.

He also joked he was going through a midlife crisis, bought a Vespa and is going to Coachella.

The writer, who made a splash last year for breaking the Rep. Andrew Weiner Twitter sexting scandal and publishing that infamous underwear shot, is the owner of aggregation site Breitbart.com and several other websites. He is an outspoken critic of President Barack Obama and the Occupy movement.

In a fiery CPAC speech, Breitbart said he would release videos from President Obama's college days that would expose him as a communist who sought to divide the country.

Barack Obama is a radical, we should not be afraid to say that! Okay? And Barack Obama was launched from [couple and Weather Underground leaders] Bill [Ayers] and Bernadine's [Dohrn's] salon. I've been there.

Watch the interview below:

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