About 20,000 uniforms and other military equipment was heading for the Islamic State group, also known as ISIS, and the Syrian branch of al-Qaeda, al-Nusra, when Spanish police intercepted the gear, United Press International reported Friday.

A Spanish Interior Ministry official said the terrorists “would have been able to equip an entire army, which would be perfectly prepared to enter combat in any of the centers of conflict where terrorist jihadist organizations operate in the world," UPI reported.

Three large shipping vessels, which were marked as clothing for humanitarian aid, were found in the Spanish ports of Algeciras and Valencia, and contained about 11,000 pounds of illicit goods. The uniforms were not made in Spain, but the ministry said they came through a network of established suppliers to the terror groups, which also provides them with weapons, technology and other goods.

Police arrested seven people during the operation suspected of giving logistical and financial support to the militants, CNN reported. One of these men police said gave money, electronics, firearms and materials for making explosives to the terror groups.

This is not the first time Spain has had to deal with the terror organizations. The country, along with others such as France, Germany and Italy, have been accused of funding terrorism stemming from ransom paid for hostages, the Independent reported. It is thought al-Qaeda made $125 million from ransom money between 2008 and 2014.


Spanish and Moroccan authorities arrested 14 people in August on suspicion of creating part of a recruiting network with the end game of sending soldiers to ISIS, the Wall Street Journal reported. Prior to August’s arrests, 47 people had been arrested in Spain on terrorism-related charges in 2015. European countries have been on an increased terror alert since the November terror attacks in Paris, which claimed 130 lives and for which ISIS has claimed responsibility.