It's no secret that the release of Mass Effect 3 stirred controversy among the gaming community. Some fans have expressed disappointment and outrage at the trilogy's ending, claiming that the decisions and events created in the previous installments weren't accurately executed in the finale. Mass Effect 3 launched March 6, and more than two months later, opinions are still as passionate as ever.

Industry heavyweights are beginning to share their insight on the matter, with head of Treyarch Mark Lamia commenting to the Official Xbox Magazine on the Mass Effect uproar.

We're not afraid to end the game on a note that people aren't used to, [but ME3] had no bearing on what we're doing, he said. What ships in our box -- that's going to be what we wanted to create. Those are going to be the endings we wanted to deliver to the player.

Treyarch's upcoming venture Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 will be the first title in the franchise to have multiple endings, hopefully ensuring that fans will connect with at least one of the possibilities.

But the community of Mass Effect enthusiasts is continuing to voice concerns on the adventure RPG-shooter's conclusion, with some players going a bit too far. Earlier in May a campaign known as Operation Letter Tsunami was launched in which fans sent open letters and postcards to BioWare officials. The movement was meant to promote awareness to the company in a civil and sincere manner, but BioWare community manager Chris Priestly has received threatening messages.

I am sure that I speak for everyone here when I say that we are deeply saddened and disgusted by such behavior, writes Hold The Line's Clarissant. In their immaturity this person has hurt the very cause that they are fighting for.

As of now it is unclear who sent the postcard, but Clarissant assures that the matter is being investigated. It is likely that the culprit is not a member of the Hold The Line community, but a fan that joined the cause across other platforms.

Unfortunately the threats were sent on a postcard bearing the HTL logo, thus Mr. Priestly's understandable assumption that it came from us, she continued.

When receiving the postcard, Priestly posted on Twitter hoping to discover who the sender could be.

Part 1- Was just sent material from HTL on how they 'won't accept' the Extended Cut and will desert us if do EC instead of new endings, he posted May 22.

A subsequent tweet read:

Part 2- So this was from one person or from the organization? Makes it hard to politely accept things when they are flat out threats.

A zero-tolerance policy has been implemented for this type of behavior in the community, according to Clarissant's post.

This is the Internet, it's full of people who get a perverse thrill from antagonizing others while hiding behind their screens, she said. Try as we might the staff can't catch them all, we can only try to continue to encourage an environment of civility and respect.

Clarissant encouraged members to reach out to Priestly, who has been an avid poster in their forums, on behalf of HTL. One fan contacted the BioWare community official on Twitter to ask if he had seen HTL's response, saying that the sender may be banned from the forum.

I hope they don't and asked them not to, Priestly replied. Whoever sent it is allowed their opinion and to voice it like anyone else.

BioWare plans to release the Mass Effect 3: Extended Cut DLC for free this summer, which may remedy some issues with the controversial ending. No details about what the additional footage will entail has been released yet, but voice actors Lance Henriksen and Tricia Helfer confirmed that they will be returning.