Tinder is joining the earliest electronic dating services and adding support for web.

The app is designed to virtually introduce users to others in a set radius around them via photos and a short biography. Based on that limited information users swipe right if they’re intrigued or left if they’re not. If both users swipe right, they’re matched and can begin a conversation.

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Tinder originated as an app, but soon it will be available in web browsers on any device. The goal is to make Tinder available to anyone, people who may not necessarily have a cell phone but do have access to a computer, or for people who are in class or at work and can’t take out their phone at any time to swipe away.

"Introducing Tinder Online: a fun, new web experience and your English professor’s worst nightmare," said the announcement from Tinder about the expansion.

While the web version of the app isn’t yet available, the announcement said that the online experience will be a little limited compared to the app, but eventually Tinder plans to make the online format just as good as the app and available to people who don’t have Facebook.

The web format is only currently available in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Indonesia, Italy, Mexico, Philippines, and Sweden.