U.S. travelers may be able to visit the EU as soon as this week and may not be required to have proof of a COVID vaccination.

European Union member states officially agreed Wednesday to add the U.S. to the list of countries and territories approved for travel in its 27 member countries, which is expected to go into effect by the end of the week, German publication Deutsche Welle reported.

According to reports, EU member states will allow each country to determine their own requirement for entry for international visitors. The requirements could include a negative COVID test, proof of vaccination, or a required quarantine period.

Nonessential travel from the U.S. to the EU was banned during the pandemic to prevent the spread of the virus, but with the rollout of the COVID vaccine gathering steam, 27 EU ambassadors located in Brussels have recommended that the region allow American travelers admittance from eight new countries and territories including the U.S., sources told CNBC.

Albania, North Macedonia, Serbia, Lebanon, Taiwan, Macau, and Hong Kong, were also added to the safe travel list.

The U.K. still has not been added to the EU’s safe travel list, despite nearly have of its citizens being fully vaccinated against the virus.

An EU official told CNBC that the U.K. continues to be banned from EU travel “due to the delta variant.”

The EU’s safe travel list, which is reviewed by member states every two weeks, previously only included the countries of Japan, Australia, Israel, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand.

Selfies in Venice: while the United States remains mostly closed to European visitors due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Europe is opening its doors to tourists from the US. Selfies in Venice: while the United States remains mostly closed to European visitors due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Europe is opening its doors to tourists from the US. Photo: AFP / ANDREA PATTARO