NASA’s asteroid tracking system has detected four space rocks that are currently hurtling toward Earth. According to the space agency, one of the approaching asteroids is almost as big as the Great Pyramid of Giza.

The first asteroid that’s expected to fly past Earth on Monday has been identified by the Center for Near Earth Object Studies (CNEOS) as 2019 UT1. As indicated in the agency’s database, this asteroid is currently flying towards Earth at a speed of almost 20,000 miles per hour. It has an estimated diameter of around 69 feet.

CNEOS noted that 2019 UT1 will approach Earth on Oct. 28 at 11:02 a.m. EDT. During this time, the asteroid will be about 0.01215 astronomical units or roughly 1.1 million miles away.

The second asteroid that will visit Earth’s vicinity is called 2019 UE1. According to CNEOS, the asteroid is currently flying at a speed of 15,000 miles per hour. The agency estimated that 2019 UE1 is about 131 feet wide.

The agency predicted that 2019 UE1 will zip past the planet on Oct. 28 at 12:51 p.m. EDT from a distance of 0.02191 astronomical units or about 2 million miles away.

Trailing behind 2019 UE1 is an asteroid known as 2019 UC. As noted by CNEOS, this asteroid is flying with a velocity of almost 20,000 miles per hour and has an estimated diameter of around 289 feet.

2019 UC is expected to enter Earth’s neighborhood on Oct. 28 at 9:29 p.m. EDT. During its approach, the asteroid will be about 0.00749 astronomical units or roughly 700,000 miles from the planet’s center.

The last asteroid that will fly past Earth on Monday is called 2019 TR2. According to CNEOS, this asteroid will approach Earth with a speed of about 31,000 miles per hour. It has an estimated diameter of 394 feet, making it the biggest asteroid in the group.

2019 TR2 is expected to make its debut in Earth’s vicinity on Oct. 29 at 11:27 p.m. EDT. During this time, the asteroid will be about 0.04959 astronomical units or around 4.6 million miles from the planet’s center.

NASA Asteroid family Mars and Jupiter This artist concept catastrophic collisions between asteroids located in the belt between Mars and Jupiter and how they have formed families of objects on similar orbits around the sun. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech