The SpaceX launch of Starlink satellites on Monday night to augment global internet connectivity made a delightful sky event for residents in many parts of the United States and many mistook it for UFO or aliens.

Skygazers from California to the East Coast were treated to a bright sky event that had a stream of unusual lights fluttering on the sky during Monday night.

The space company launched 60 new Starlink satellites into the orbit under CEO Elon Musk’s vision of providing space-based broadband internet system, per SpaceX news.

The satellites were launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida. There was more excitement in San Diego where residents wondered whether they are witnessing a UFO or a bunch of aliens or the Santa Claus himself coming so early with Christmas lights.

Such was the bright glow visible across San Diego that could excite any Santa tracker.

According to San Diego news, many people took to twitter expressing awe. “I saw it. My whole family did. From San Diego. Heading south. It was about 9 or so lights. All on a line” wrote Bill the Butcher.

In a statement, SpaceX said, “Starlink system is enabled by a constellation of low Earth orbit satellites to provide fast, reliable internet" to populations facing little or no connectivity, including rural communities and places where existing "services are too expensive or unreliable."

Reports also said the Starlink system will require more launches to attain a critical mass so that commercial operations can start and deliver internet services that will beat any internet speed test.

The clear sky added to the excitement of watching the sheen beamed by the tiny satellites as if an astral phenomenon in alien movies like the Thing where a stream of lights parades over the sky.

The rationale for the night glow was that the freshly launched satellites are deployed at a lower orbit at 174 miles from the surface and are easily visible on Earth. After the review of initial data, these satellites will be pushed up by the thrusters to a higher orbit.

In terms of launch details, a Falcon 9 rocket was used in the launch of the 60 satellites.  (L-R) NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, SpaceX founder Elon Musk, and astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken speaking during a news conference at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, California on October 10, 2019 (L-R) NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, SpaceX founder Elon Musk, and astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken speaking during a news conference at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, California on October 10, 2019 Photo: www.philippachecophoto.com / Philip Pacheco