Apple’s macOS Catalina update is now available for installation. But before you do so, you’ll have to backup your files first. Here’s what else you need to know before installing the macOS Catalina.

While the new macOS Catalina brings new features and more stability to the Mac unit, it actually stops support for some 32-bit programs. This means that any files and apps with that format cannot be opened with that computer anymore and could be completely lost in your Apple computer forever. Fortunately, backing up files is now easy.

Stay With Mojave

As seen on the macOS Reddit, many users are dissuading other users from using the macOS Catalina immediately. Some users are stuck on the macOS Catalina and found their apps and files unopenable. Reddit user Essilfie_ confirmed such effects on their unit after installing the beta OS.

If your Mac unit still has many important files which you’re not sure which are still 32-bit compatible, it’s best to wait for the official release of macOS Catalina this coming September.

Time Machine

The Time Machine feature in Macs works like a save file in video games but requires a good amount of space to keep in your unit. To turn this feature on, go to the System Preferences and it’ll just be there. With the Time Machine, any lost files you might need upon updating with the macOS Catalina could be found again.

However, make sure to provide an external storage device to keep files that cannot be carried over into the new macOS update but is crucial to keep around. External hard drives would do for big files and flash drives

Online Cloud Storage

Online cloud storage services that backup your files by the second are real apps thanks to Backblaze and others. Both of these subscription services help its users through uploading their files to their servers. The first part requires a massive upload of the user’s computer files through the internet but gets back to regular internet speed once everything is on the cloud.

macOS Mojave Apple has rolled out macOS Mojave 10.14.1 beta to developers. Photo: Reuters/Elijah Nouvelage