As Twitter continues to rid its platform of suspicious accounts, many users, including influential profiles like U.S. President Donald Trump, could see a significant drop in followers.

Since Twitter announced that it would be working to reduce questionable accounts, President Trump has lost about 100,000 of his 53.4 million followers, while former president Barack Obama is down almost 400,000 of his 104 million followers as of Wednesday, according to a report from Washington Post. This change is the social media site’s latest move in its war against abusive or fake accounts.

Twitter CEO Jack Dosey tweeted out a message on Wednesday stating that the popular microblogging site would be "removing locked Twitter accounts (locked when we detect suspicious changes in behavior) from follower counts across profiles globally," adding that " the number of followers displayed on many profiles may go down."

"Most people will see a change of four followers or fewer; others with larger follower counts will experience a more significant drop. We understand this may be hard for some, but we believe accuracy and transparency make Twitter a more trusted service for public conversation," Vijaya Gadde, Twitter's Legal, Policy and Trust & Safety Lead, said in a blog post.

"Over the years, we've locked accounts when we detected sudden changes in account behavior," Gadde explained. "In these situations, we reach out to the owners of the accounts, and unless they validate the account and reset their passwords, we keep them locked with no ability to log in."

However, not all the accounts are bogus, and many could be frozen for reasons including verification issues, according to Gadde. Other accounts were locked for tweeting large amounts of unwarranted replies or mentions, misleading links, or "if a large number of accounts block the account after mentioning them." 

President Trump and Barack Obama President Trump and former president Barack Obama have both lost Twitter followers as a result of the social networking site purging questionable its accounts. President Obama and Trump are pictured at the White House on Jan. 20, 2017 in Washington, D.C Photo: Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images