Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Sunday praised protests across the country over the death of 46-year-old African-American George Floyd, but condemned violence and looting at the demonstrations.

“These last few days have laid bare that we are a nation furious at injustice. Every person of conscience can understand the rawness of the trauma people of color experience in this country, from the daily indignities to the extreme violence, like the horrific killing of George Floyd,” Biden said in a blog post. “Protesting such brutality is right and necessary. It’s an utterly American response. But burning down communities and needless destruction is not. Violence that endangers lives is not. Violence that guts and shutters businesses that serve the community is not.”

“We are a nation in pain, but we must not allow this pain to destroy us. We are a nation enraged, but we cannot allow our rage to consume us. We are a nation exhausted, but we will not allow our exhaustion to defeat us,” Biden continued.

Biden on Friday spoke with MSNBC and CNN to address the death of Floyd.

In his 391-word blog posting, Biden made efforts to heal the wounds of the country.

These last few days have laid bare that we are a nation furious at injustice. Every person of conscience can understand the rawness of the trauma people of color experience in this country, from the daily indignities to the extreme violence, like the horrific killing of George Floyd.

Protesting such brutality is right and necessary. It’s an utterly American response. But burning down communities and needless destruction is not. Violence that endangers lives is not. Violence that guts and shutters businesses that serve the community is not.

The act of protesting should never be allowed to overshadow the reason we protest. It should not drive people away from the just cause that protest is meant to advance.

I know that there are people all across this country who are suffering tonight. Suffering the loss of a loved one to intolerable circumstances, like the Floyd family, or to the virus that is still gripping our nation. Suffering economic hardships, whether due to COVID-19 or entrenched inequalities in our system. And I know that a grief that dark and deep may at times feel too heavy to bear.

I know.

And I also know that the only way to bear it is to turn all that anguish to purpose. So tonight, I ask all of America to join me — not in denying our pain or covering it over — but using it to compel our nation across this turbulent threshold into the next phase of progress, inclusion, and opportunity for our great democracy.

We are a nation in pain, but we must not allow this pain to destroy us. We are a nation enraged, but we cannot allow our rage to consume us. We are a nation exhausted, but we will not allow our exhaustion to defeat us.

As President, I will help lead this conversation — and more importantly, I will listen. I will keep the commitment I made to George’s brother, Philonise, that George will not just be a hashtag. We must and will get to a place where everyone, regardless of race, believes that “to protect and serve” means to protect and serve them. Only by standing together will we rise stronger than before. More equal, more just, more hopeful — and that much closer to our more perfect union.

Please stay safe. Please take care of each other.

Floyd died Monday in Minneapolis after a white police officer kneeled on his neck for nearly nine minutes. The officer, Derek Chauvin, was arrested and charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter later in the week, but three other officers on the scene are still yet to be charged.

Biden on Friday spoke with Floyd’s brother, Philonese Floyd. “I asked Vice-President Biden – I never had to beg a man before – but I asked him, could he please, please get justice for my brother,” Philonise Floyd said about his conversation with Biden. 

President Trump, who campaigned in 2016 on a “law and order” platform, has also spoken with Floyd’s brother. Although Trump has expressed “our nation’s deepest condolences and heartfelt sympathies to the family of George Floyd,” Trump has been criticized for making incendiary statements during the protests. Earlier this week, Trump tweeted “when the looting starts, the shooting starts,” drawing condemnation from leaders such as Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot. 

As protestors gathered outside the White House this weekend, Trump tweeted they would be met with “ominous weapons” and “vicious dogs” if they breached the fence surrounding the building.

It’s unclear whether Trump would make a nationwide address from the White House about the protests.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has told CNN Sunday morning that Trump should “stop talking,” as she believes further remarks would escalate tensions.