KEY POINTS

  • Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's camp said only their official communications team will be responding to stories about them
  • The Duke and Duchess of Sussex's team will speak on the record or not at all when addressing reports about them
  • The move aims to boost media literacy about the couple and make it clear if the stories concerning them are verified or not

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry will no longer allow unnamed "sources" to speak for them.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex's official communications team at Archewell will be the one to comment on any reports or concerns involving the royal couple. They will not allow any unnamed sources to speak for Prince Harry and Markle moving forward, according to the team, The Telegraph reported.

The couple's communications team will speak on the record or not at all. They also warned fans not to pay attention to mystery sources claiming to speak on their behalf to the press. This will boost media literacy about the Sussexes and will make it clear to the fans if the stories are true as confirmed by their spokesman, or if they are not authorized by their camp.

The move follows Prince Harry and Markle's campaign against sections of the media that the duchess has criticized as a "model that rewards chaos above the truth." Prince Harry has also condemned the "avalanche of misinformation" online.

In 2019, five of Markle's anonymous friends talked to People in a bid to protect her from what they deemed as unfair coverage against her. During the duchess' legal battle against Mail on Sunday, the latter wanted to release the identities of her five pals, which prompted her dad, Thomas Markle Sr., to share her letter with Daily Mail. Markle disagreed to this to protect her friends.

"These five women are not on trial, and nor am I," Markle said in her witness statement. "The publisher of the Mail on Sunday is the one on trial. It is this publisher that acted unlawfully and is attempting to evade accountability; to create a circus and distract from the point of this case—that the Mail on Sunday unlawfully published my private letter."

Markle said that her pals are private citizens and have a basic right to privacy. She added that the tabloid had no reason to reveal their identities other than for "clickbait."

Markle's five friends had nothing but praises for her during their interview with People. One said Markle was a "royalty from the day I met her."

"The way she carries herself, interacts with people, is how you would expect an actual royal to behave. She personifies elegance, grace, philanthropy," the anonymous insider said.

"She can make a five-star meal out of the garbage in your refrigerator," another added.

Markle won her copyright infringement case against the Associated Newspapers for publishing her letter to her dad via The Mail on Sunday and Mail Online. The outlet issued a public apology to the duchess on Mail on Sunday's front page and Mail Online's homepage.

The Associated Newspapers was also required to pay Markle 90% of the estimated 1.8 million legal expenses for pursuing the 18-month-long case.

Meghan won a ruling in February that Associated Newspapers had breached her privacy by publishing extracts of a letter she wrote to her estranged father before her marriage to Prince Harry Meghan won a ruling in February that Associated Newspapers had breached her privacy by publishing extracts of a letter she wrote to her estranged father before her marriage to Prince Harry Photo: POOL via AFP / Jeremy Selwyn