As the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump expands there is a concern that Trump’s Republican camp may revolt as signals from the recent polls suggest more Republicans are favoring his censure.

But the silver ling for the President is that despite a heap of bad news around Trump impeachment stemming as allegations by Democrat rivals the job approval rating of Trump has not suffered.

Meanwhile, House Democrats subpoenaed the Pentagon, Office of Management and Budget on the decision to withhold foreign aid to Ukraine asked to hand over all documents by Oct. 15.

But the latest surveys are showing a high tide in public sentiment favoring Trump’s impeachment.  In the Economist/YouGov poll 51 percent including one in eight Republicans wanted the Senate to remove Trump from office if the House votes to impeach him.

Monmouth University poll last week had shown 86 percent of Republicans are backing Trump and his approval rating is intact with 41 percent of Americans approving his job performance while 53 percent have disapproved.

So far the president has ensured backing from Republicans barring rebels like Sen. Mitt Romney on the president’s action seeking legal action against former Vice President Joe Biden with a foreign country’s head.

However, the share of Republicans seeking Trump impeachment inquiry has jumped to 16 percent from 8 percent in August. That must worry Trump.

According to a CBS News poll, 23 percent of Republicans are backing an impeachment probe. A survey by USA Today said 30 percent of Republicans slammed the Ukraine episode as “abuse of power” that asked Ukraine to probe Biden.

 “If you’re the president you have to take that seriously,” commented former Republican strategist Tom Davis.

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman also broke with Republican colleagues and called Trump’s conduct “not appropriate.”

But Portman did not support impeachment saying Congress needs to be “very careful” on that step.

Although Democrats have the strength to pass impeachment articles in the House over the Ukraine news they will need at least 19 Republican votes to convict and remove Trump from office in senate.

But the rising interest among mainstream Republicans to track discussions and polls on impeachment underscores Trump’s expanding threat within the party including defections.

“I certainly wouldn’t vote to impeach based on what I’ve seen so far,” said Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma, a former executive director of the Republican National Committee. “I’m not going to rule it in or out.”  US President Donald Trump has angered even his own Republican allies with the Syria pullout decision US President Donald Trump has angered even his own Republican allies with the Syria pullout decision Photo: AFP / Andrew CABALLERO-REYNOLDS

Trump says Rick Perry to blame for Ukraine call  

Meanwhile, Trump news said the President blamed Energy Secretary Rick Perry for forcing him to make the midsummer phone call to Ukrainian President.

Trump told this to House Republicans on Friday and added: “it was a call I didn't want to make.”

In the meantime, despite some wavering by White House on an effective strategy to counter the impeachment inquiry, President Donald Trump's re-election work has earned momentum.

The Republican National Committee (RNC) on Monday held a conference call and prepared White House talking points and it played down national polling on impeachment. The meet planned more ad buys and soliciting new donors.

The campaign sought to go on the offensive.  During the campaign's call, communications director Tim Murtaugh slammed Democrats' “never-ending fishing expedition,” and termed the allegation around Trump’s Ukrainian call and questions around it as an excuse to “tear down President Trump.”