The names given to members of the royal family have different meanings and significance.

Following the announcement of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s son’s name, Us Weekly compiled the names of some members of the British clan and explained what they really mean.

Queen Elizabeth II’s complete name is Queen Elizabeth Alexandra Mary. She shares the same first name with her mom, Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon or the Queen Mother. Alexandra is a traditional name for the British royal family, while Mary is a moniker that was passed down from the Queen’s aunt and grandmother.

Prince Charles’ full name is Charles Philip Arthur George. Charles has been handed down throughout the royal family’s lineage, which dates as far back as the 1600s. Arthur and George are traditional names among the royal family. George also comes from the Queen’s dad’s name, King George. Philip is from Prince Charles’ dad Prince Philip.

Prince William’s full name is William Arthur Philip Louis. He and his dad share the moniker Arthur. Philip is inspired by the Duke of Edinburgh, and Louis comes from Prince Philip’s late uncle Louis Mountbatten.

Prince Harry or Prince Henry Charles Albert David is named as Henry after the Queen’s late uncle. Charles is handed down from his dad, Prince Charles. The Queen’s dad, King George VI, was originally named Albert before he ascended the throne. David is a common moniker in the royal family.

Prince George’s full name is Prince George Alexander Louis. The name of Prince William and Middleton’s eldest child echoes the Queen heritage since her dad is known as King George VI. When Prince George becomes King, he may be referred to King George VII.

Alexander is a tribute to one of the Queen’s middle names, Alexandra. And Louis comes from Prince Philip’s late uncle and Louis is also part of Prince William’s full name.

On Wednesday, it was announced that Markle and Prince Harry have named their son Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor. The names are not common among the royal family.

Royal Family Pictured: Royal family leave a Service of Thanksgiving for the life and work of Lord Snowdon at Westminster Abbey on April 7, 2017 in London, United Kingdom. Photo: Getty Images/Hannah McKay-WPA Pool