Camilla Parker Bowles recently opened up about Prince Charles’ future as King and said that her husband will stop doing one thing when he takes over the throne.

In the BBC documentary “Prince, Son, and Heir: Charles at 70,” the Duchess of Cornwall said that Prince Charles will not prioritize his wife when he takes over the monarchy, and Bowles has no problem with this.

“Duty will always come first to him. Duty to the monarchy, duty to the country, duty to the Commonwealth,” she said (via Express).

Bowles also opened up about Prince Charles’ walking Meghan Markle down the aisle on May 19 when she wed Prince Harry. Markle’s dad was invited to the royal wedding, but he was unable to attend due to his heart surgery.

“I think that was very touching sitting where I was you couldn’t hear what he said but afterward watching it on the television I think it was a lovely gesture. I don’t think people realize how kind he is,” she said.

Bowles was delighted that Prince Harry wed Markle and that Prince Charles played a crucial role at the wedding that she watched the highlights on television. The mom of two also said that Prince Charles was quite a gentleman when he took Markle’s mom’s hand when they signed the registry.

“A lot of people seeing my husband take the bride’s mother by the hand to sign the registry, it’s something that moves everybody. It’s the things he does behind the scenes that people don’t know about. I don’t think people really quite know how kind he is,” she gushed (via Express).

Bowles and Prince Charles have been married for 13 years, but they have dated way before that. In fact, when Prince Charles was still married to Princess Diana, he had an affair with Bowles. The Duchess of Cornwall was one of the reasons why Princess Diana’s marriage failed.

Camilla Parker Bowles, Prince Charles Camilla Parker Bowles spoke fondly of Prince Charles in BBC's documentary. Pictured: Bowles, Prince Charles meet with King Otumfuo Nana Osei Tutu II at a Durbar and Tea with the Asantehene at Manhiya Palace on November 4, 2018 in Kumasi, Ghana. Photo: Getty Images/Chris Jackson