Although Buckingham Palace has not made an official announcement about when Queen Elizabeth will abdicate the throne, some royal experts believe the 93-year-old will step away from the throne once she turns 95.

Whenever the monarch decides to step down from the position, her son Prince Charles will become the king, and Camilla Parker Bowles will become his queen. While insiders have claimed Elizabeth has been training Charles to take her place, a new report claims she is also preparing Camilla to become his main support system.

Over the last few years, Queen Elizabeth has reduced her number of public engagements. Meanwhile, Prince Charles has ramped up his number of appearances. In 2018, the Prince of Wales reportedly made 507 engagements, whereas Camilla has decreased her workload.

According to Express UK, Camilla’s absence from events may have been at the request of Queen Elizabeth. When Prince Charles becomes king, Camilla is expected to take on a role similar to Prince Phillip and become the future monarch’s right hand.

Camilla initially struggled to gain favor with the public and royal family after Princess Diana detailed her affair with Prince Charles. However, over the years, Camilla has managed to win admiration due to her dedication to more than 90 charities.

Royal expert Penny Juror previously told GoodHousekeeping.com that it appears Camilla has been accepted by Queen Elizabeth. “Camilla will be a hugely supportive consort. She will give Charles the strength and confidence to do the job he was born to do,” she explained.

“He will be a better king for having her by his side,” the royal biographer added.

Although Camilla has decreased her number of public appearances, she and Prince Charles have continued to put on a united front whenever they step out for royal engagements.

Prince Charles Camilla Parker Bowles and Queen Elizabeth II Prince William, Camilla and Queen Elizabeth II watch the RAF flypast on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, as members of the Royal Family attend events to mark the centenary of the RAF on July 10, 2018 in London. Photo: Getty Images/Chris Jackson