KEY POINTS

  • FBI warns of nation-wide unrest ahead of Inauguration Day
  • D.C’s mayor is ‘extremely’ concerned about safety
  • Bomb threat closed Michigan's capitol building last week

With the FBI warning of unrest across state capitals ahead of Inauguration Day, Michigan’s attorney general said Tuesday that her state was not safe.

An internal FBI memo obtained by CNN warns of armed protests in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., in the days leading up to Jan. 20, when President-elect Joe Biden is sworn into office.

"On 8 January, the FBI received information on an identified group calling for others to join them in 'storming' state, local and federal government courthouses and administrative buildings in the event POTUS is removed as President prior to Inauguration Day,” the bulletin reads. “This identified group is also planning to 'storm' government offices including in the District of Columbia and in every state, regardless of whether the states certified electoral votes for Biden or Trump, on 20 January.”

State leaders have expressed concern that supporters of President Donald Trump would carry out threats against their capitals in the days leading up to the inauguration. In Michigan, where the outcome of the election was challenged repeatedly by the president, the capitol building was locked down following a bomb threat last week.

That prompted an alarm Tuesday from Michigan Attorney Gen. Dana Nessel, who posted on Twitter that she wasn’t going to sugarcoat the threat level in Lansing.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, was the target of a kidnapping plot in October. Whitmer, who was often publicly criticized by Trump, was the target of a pro-Trump militia.

The threat concerns are not isolated to Michigan, as there was also a similar kidnapping plot in Virginia.

Just days after Trump supporters laid siege to the Capitol building in Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser said she was “extremely” concerned about security in the days leading up to the inauguration.

“We believe strongly that the 59th Presidential Inauguration on January 20 will require a very different approach than previous inaugurations given the chaos, injury, and death experienced at the United States Capitol during the insurrection,” Bowser said in a statement.

In New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio said there were no apparent security threats to the city.

“The threats appeared to be focused on state capitals, so I'm certainly concerned about Albany whether they may have a problem up there, but right now nothing that would affect New York City,” he said Monday. “But if we get those kinds of threats or see information, the public needs to know, I'm certainly going to put it out there immediately.”

Trump on Monday issued a declaration that enhances security in the nation’s capital through Jan. 24, four days after the inauguration. Trump is facing another impeachment for allegedly inciting last week’s unrest.

After Donald Trump's supporters last week stormed the Capitol Building, there are fears of fresh unrest in Washington during Joe Biden's inauguration on January 20 After Donald Trump's supporters last week stormed the Capitol Building, there are fears of fresh unrest in Washington during Joe Biden's inauguration on January 20 Photo: AFP / Andrew CABALLERO-REYNOLDS