KEY POINTS

  •  The U.S. pays gold medalists more than twice as much as countries like Australia and Canada
  • The country's first 2022 Winter Olympic gold came from snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis
  • Among the most generous nations is Turkey, which pays roughly $380,000 for a gold medal

Finishing on the podium and taking home a medal is a matter of national pride, but for some athletes, it would mean taking home thousands in cash bonuses. 

Per the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympic Games website, the U.S. has won seven golds, six silvers and three bronzes so far at the Winter Olympics, which featured 15 sports and 109 events from skiing to figure skating.

The first gold came from snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis who slid to victory in the women's snowboard cross, putting an end to Team USA's five-day gold-less streak at the Winter Olympics. 

As the 2022 Winter Olympics has come to a close, with more than 200 out of the 300 medals already awarded to athletes from around the world, take a look at how much exactly gold medalists in the U.S. get paid. 

According to reports, some countries pay gold medalists more than six figures but not the U.S.

American Olympians who win a gold medal get awarded $37,500. Silver medalists get $22,400, while bronze medalists get $15,000, as per Forbes.

This is on top of the grants and benefits like health insurance that is more available to Team USA athletes. This is not funded by the government but by the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee, which fundraises through a nonprofit foundation.

Forbes said the U.S. is in the middle of the global medal-bonus spectrum. It pays more than twice as much as countries like Australia and Canada and roughly half as much as France and Romania. 

Among the most generous nations are Turkey, which pays roughly $380,000 for a gold medal; Hong Kong, which promises $642,000; and Malaysia, which gives $238,000 to gold medalists. 

Unfortunately, not every country offers compensation for medal winners. Britain, Iceland and Norway, which topped the medal table at the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics, are among the countries that do not offer medal bonuses but provide other grants to athletes.  

Of all the 91 countries and territories competing in the Winter Olympics, at least 32 said they would pay cash prizes for medals. 

The Beijing Winter Olympics have become the most politicised in recent memory The Beijing Winter Olympics have become the most politicised in recent memory Photo: AFP / NOEL CELIS