A woman in South Carolina who claimed she was Jesus Christ and had the power to control President Donald Trump with a bracelet on her arm was accused of slashing a man’s throat during an argument Thursday, according to an initial report from the Spartanburg County Sheriff’s Office. Ashley Nicole Bailey, 29, was charged with attempted murder and possession of a weapon during a violent crime, according to her arrest warrant.

Police were dispatched to Bailey’s home in Spartanburg County around 6:15 p.m. local time after receiving a call about an attempted suicide. They arrived to find a man with blood rushing out of a large gash on his throat. The man told the police that Baily slashed his neck after he locked her out of her house in an argument, which caused her to be exceptionally angry. The victim was then rushed to a local hospital, according to local reports Friday.

Police who spoke with Baily said she maintained that the man had attempted to kill himself and cut own his throat during their argument. When asked where the knife was, Bailey became visibly agitated and said she wanted to talk to an attorney. Bailey claimed she never intended on hurting the man, and she also, “talked of controlling Donald Trump with the bracelet on her arm as well as referring to herself as Jesus Christ and the Illuminati,” according to a police report.

“I ain’t owning up to this,” she reportedly added.

Spartanburg Country had a population of roughly 290,000 people in 2013, according to U.S. Census data. It is located just south of the state’s border with North Carolina and about 74 miles southeast of Charlotte, North Carolina. Roughly 63 percent of the people in Spartanburg County voted for Trump in the 2017 election, while 33 percent voted for Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Baily was taken to the sheriff’s office and later charged. She was being held at the Spartanburg Detention Center without bail. The victim was not named.

The term "Illuminati" refers to the Bavarian Illuminati, a secret society founded by a German law professor in 1776 to promote reason, philanthropy and other secular values among elites. It consisted of up to 2,500 members before it's end in 1785, but conspiracy theorists still claim the group wields influence over modern leaders.