The New York passenger seatbelt law will go into effect on Sunday, requiring all backseat passengers to buckle up.

The seatbelt law in the state previously required only those under the age of 16 to wear a seatbelt when riding in the backseat of a vehicle.

“We’ve known for decades that seat belts save lives and with this measure, we are further strengthening our laws and helping to prevent needless tragedies,” New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a statement.

“It was under my father’s leadership that New York became the first state in the country to pass a seat belt law, and the nation followed his lead. Now we are building upon this legacy and helping to create a safer and stronger Empire State for all.”

The bill was signed by Cuomo back in August but will not go into effect until Sunday.

Those that fail to comply with the new regulation will be faced with a $50 fine, according to WTEN, an ABC affiliate out of Albany.

New York was the first state to pass a mandatory seatbelt law when Gov. Mario Cuomo signed the legislation into law in 1984. In the first year of being signed, the New York Department of Motor Vehicles said that about 16% of individuals wore seatbelts. By 2008, this number had increased to 89%, according to the agency.

According to the Cuomo’s Traffic Safety Committee, as many as 30% of highway deaths in New York were from occupants not wearing seatbelts.

A crash test dummy is displayed inside a Toyota vehicle to demonstrate Toyota's Whiplash Injury Lessening Concept Seat at its showroom in Tokyo A crash test dummy is displayed inside a Toyota vehicle to demonstrate Toyota's Whiplash Injury Lessening Concept Seat at its showroom in Tokyo, February 3, 2010. Photo: REUTERS