A new Utah measure may provide people with the ability to sue pornographers.

State Senator Todd Weiler (R-Woods Cross) led a 2016 resolution that declared a public health crisis caused by pornography, the first of its kind in the United States. Now, one of the two related bills being drafted by Weiler will allow for pornographers to be sued if watching their product causes emotional and psychological damage to people.

The second bill would attempt at closing a loophole by making it mandatory for public libraries to filter porn out on wireless as well as wired internet connections.

“Right now porn is available without any warnings and labeling, without any protections online,” Weiler told the Salt Lake Tribune. “This would just open the valve for a cause of action. Let these attorneys go after these cases.”

According to Weiler, who was to expand accountability from impact on children and teen to include adults, even if legislature passes the bill, courts may reject the claims. The Republican, however, remained optimistic: “But I think, eventually, the tide will turn.”

A lawyer by profession, Weiler has linked his opinions to court cases that proved cigarettes caused cancer and says his idea is constitutionally sound because it would require people to legally prove they were harmed and that they deserve to receive damages.

“We’ve got to say, ‘This is a problem,’” Robert Marshall, a Republican delegate to the Virginia Assembly, told the Washington Post recently, in line with Weiler’s views. “Before smoking was identified as a problem, at least the recognition that it led to certain pathologies was a starting point to put restrictions on it.”

While Marshall hopes that Virginia will be the second state to declare a public health emergency in line with Utah’s move, Tennessee's Legislature is debating a similar measure.