Prince Harry and Meghan Markle continue to support Princess Diana even though she passed away several years ago.

The royal couple will reportedly join the performers of Cirque du Soleil to show their support for Prince Harry’s charity, Sentebale. The charity helps support young people in Lesotho, Malawi and Botswana who are suffering from HIV.

Prince Harry and Markle will serve as the guest of honor at the premiere of the Canadian circus company’s production “Totem.” Prior to their appearance, Johnny Hornby, the chairman of Sentebale, released a statement expressing his excitement over the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s invitation.

“At Sentebale, a large part of our educational work with children and adolescents has focused around engaging them through play, entertainment, and music. We’re very grateful to everyone at Cirque du Soleil for giving us the opportunity to shine a light on the work that Sentebale does to help children and young adults affected by HIV to live happy, healthy, and productive lives,” he said.

The performance that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will attend will be the second show in a series of Sentebale nights. It will also follow the success of the Broadway musical “Hamilton,” which the royal couple also attended as part of their fundraising activity.

Prince Harry co-founded the charity Sentebale in 2004 during his gap year trip to Lesotho. He is working closely with the country’s Prince Seeiso, the younger brother of King Letsie III.

Sentebale was established in memory of Princess Diana and the mom of Prince Seeiso. The name Sentebale translates to the flower forget-me-not, which was the Princess of Wales’ favorite flower as a child.

Meanwhile, Princess Diana was actively involved in educating people all over the world about HIV and AIDS. Many years ago, she made headlines for shaking the hands of a man suffering with the illness without gloves.

In April 1987, Princess Diana also opened the first purpose built HIV/AIDS unit that exclusively cared for patients infected with the virus, according to BBC.