Spotify is looking into going public later this year, but it may be taking an unconventional approach towards doing so. The streaming music company is weighing going public via a direct listing, according to the Wall Street Journal.

A direct listing differs from a standard initial public offering in several ways. As the Wall Street Journal points out, a direct listing involves a company putting its shares into a public exchange and letting buyers and sellers trade them at prices set by general supply and demand. With a direct listing, a company also wouldn’t need to raise money or seek underwriters for additional stock blocks. Traditional IPOs tend to be a more involved process for companies and prices are set after deliberations and meetings with investors.

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Few companies at Spotify’s scale have taken a similar approach towards going public. Spotify could still choose to go with a traditional IPO, as the lack of precedent for direct listing could pose some risks for the company. While a direct listing saves Spotify some money that would normally go to partners in an IPO, a straight market for shares could result in unpredictable price.

At the same time, the smaller scope of a direct listing could fit Spotify’s current needs. As Nimay Mehta, a partner at Spotify investor Lead Edge Capital, pointed out to Mic, Spotify doesn’t drastically need the amount of additional cash that a traditional IPO could bring in.

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Spotify’s move also reflects a shift among tech companies away from IPOs as a traditional endgame. While IPOs have resulted in major paydays for larger companies, the regular increased pressure from investors can cause volatility for others. Since its IPO in March, Snapchat has seen regular swings in its share price. For now, Spotify looks to be on sounder financial footing and plans to take advantage of it when, and however, it goes public.