A man carrying a live alligator with its mouth taped shut entered a convenience store in Jacksonville, Florida, Thursday.

In a video posted on Facebook, the man identified as Robby Stratton is seen holding the gator while he goes in to the store for beer. “Y'all got beer still? Y'all ain't out, are y'all?” he is heard saying in the video.

He then turns to someone and says “Is he taking the last bit of beer? You aren't taking the last bit of beer are you?”

He is then seen jokingly chasing another customer as people in the store laugh before he grabs a pack of beer. 

Karen Parker, a public information officer from The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said the incident is being investigated and they were informed about the incident Friday via their wildlife alert number.

No charges have been levied on the man as the incident is still under investigation.

 “All I have to say is it was all fun and games. Everybody in the store was friends and everyone was laughing and having a good time. No one in the situation was scared or mad,” Stratton said.

"I don't even remember coming up here,” Stratton told CBS-affiliated television station WJAX. "This store sells some good liquor and I drank a lot of it that night.”

He said he found the alligator in the back of a truck. When asked about the consequences of his actions, he said “It was stupid and I’ll be facing some charges here soon and probably go to jail.”

Haleigh Aceves, a caretaker of gators at St. Augustine Alligator Farm said she feels very bad for the gator adding while some may only see the shock factor, she sees an animal.

"If you saw someone slamming a dog around like that, chasing people with it, you'd probably think the dog doesn't like that," she said. "Reptiles, they can get really stressed out actually pretty easily, and the way that their body works, if they get extremely stressed out, they can actually cause an acidosis and they can die.”

"It's not easy to have an alligator, they don't make good pets. You need to have a lot of experience, over 1,000 hours working with them. You can't just take one,” Aceves said according to First Coast News. "They're a protected species, so if you're endangering them, harassing them, anything like that, it's a felony.”