The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a warning about eating raw cookie dough this holiday season. While this is a favorite holiday-baking treat for many, the CDC warns that eating raw cookie dough can make you sick.

The danger with eating raw cookie dough comes from the flour that is considered a raw agricultural product that may contain E.coli. Because the flour hasn’t been processed to kill this bacteria yet, there is the potential that it may contain E.coli from the field where it was produced if eaten raw.

As raw cookie dough is cooked, it kills the bacteria in flour, which until then still harbors within the food and can make a person sick. According to the CDC, a total of 63 people became ill from E.coli that was linked to raw flour in 2016. The agency also urges consumers to get ride of flour that may have been recalled because of this E.coli outbreak.

If flour wasn’t dangerous enough in its raw state, raw eggs also pose a potential problem for raw cookie dough, cakes, and bread batters. Raw eggs can contain Salmonella, which can also make a person sick if they consume it raw or lightly cooked . The CDC said that eggs are only safe to eat when properly handled and cooked.

The CDC is urging people this holiday season not to taste or eat any raw dough or batter. They also recommend that parents do not let their children play or eat raw dough including dough used in craft projects. Raw dough should be cooked to the proper temperature before eating by following the recipe or package directions, the agency said.

However, if you need your raw cookie dough fix, consumers can munch on cookie dough ice cream as the CDC has deemed it safe because it has been treated to kill harmful bacteria prior to distribution. It is also important to properly store and refrigerate raw dough until it is ready for cooking as well as washing hands, utensils and all surfaces thoroughly after handling raw eggs, flour or dough.

Raw Cookie Dough The CDC warns consumers about eating raw cookie dough this holiday season as it may contain E.coli or Salmonella bacteria. Vegan cookies are seen on display at Just headquarters office in San Francisco, California on May 4, 2018. - Just, who develops vegan products, recently started to work on a new kind of meat based on animal cells. Photo: Getty Images/JOSH EDELSON