Iconic sports-car maker Ferrari is shifting gears to another industry: fashion.

On Sunday, Ferrari launched its first ready-to-wear collection aimed at younger people that may not be familiar with its Formula 1 auto racing empire and iconic automobiles. 

The new collection, which was designed by creative director Rocco Iannone, featured an array of vibrantly printed silks in Ferrari red, electric blue and Scuderia yellow.

Models walked down a makeshift runway on the factory floor with the halted production of the Ferrari V12 cars.

The collection featured a variety of outwear, including parkas, bombers, and trenches designed with rubberized accents on pockets and sleeves with the brand’s famous Prancing Pony logo placed on the nape.

Models also wore silky midi skirts featuring various Ferrari prints, loose-fitting trousers cinched at the ankle, and wide shorts with reflective tape.

The silhouettes acted as a reflection of the automobiles on the factory floor as well as the company’s extensive car catalog. “The young generations have the power to express the energy and the power of a brand,” Iannone said of the new collection.

Ultimately, Iannone hopes “to enlarge our fan base, including young generations and women especially—although women have always been part of our fan base, but it has never been well told.”

While expanding the market reach, Iannone also decided to create an inclusive collection with sizes ranging from XXXS to XXXL.

Ferrari has already cut around 50% of licensed products aimed at Formula 1 fans, while backing away from its exclusivity to appeal to young people who may not be car enthusiasts.

The ready-to-wear collection is expected to be released over six drops throughout this year. Around 80% of the line is expected to be genderless in an effort to become more approachable and avoid becoming irrelevant.

An average person can now own a Ferrari -- or at least a part of one on paper, thanks to fractional ownership platforms An average person can now own a Ferrari -- or at least a part of one on paper, thanks to fractional ownership platforms Photo: AFP / MIGUEL MEDINA