Kate Middleton has a way to make sure that her kids listen to her.

The Duchess of Cambridge is a hands-on mom to 4-year-old Prince George and 3-year-old Princess Charlotte. She is expected to be the same to newborn Prince Louis. Parenting is not easy, but Middleton apparently knows a trick to connect with her kids more easily - eye contact.

"Eye contact is remarkably powerful and effective. Our kids have a pattern of knowing when they see our face they have our attention. And the opposite is true as well," Dr. Debi Gilboa said.

Gilboa also noted that Prince William's wife would crouch down to the level of her kids to engage with them. In several photos, Middleton can be seen stooping down to look at her kids' face as she talks to them. In this way, she will also experience the world from their point of view.

"If Catherine glances around, she is going to see more of her children's worldview and that physical change on her part can give her some insight into not only into their physical wellbeing but also emotionally what is going on," Gilboa explained.

She added that doing so can also help parents see their children's emotional state before their tantrum starts. "If you are really watching your child, sometimes you can head off the tantrum before it happens," Gilboa said. "I don’t mean by bribing them; I mean by paying attention to their cues."

Prince William and Middleton are now parents of three. They welcomed the new addition to their family, Prince Louise, on April 23. The Duchess had a speedy recovery and had stepped out for her newborn's public debut just seven hours after her delivery. As for other milestones concerning their children, the royal couple's only daughter, Princess Charlotte, just turned 3 years old on Wednesday.

Prince William and Middleton are doting parents, but they are strict when it comes to their children's privacy. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge reportedly planted 40-foot hedges in front of Kensington Palace to allow Prince George and Princess Charlotte to play outside without being seen from the gates. They also implemented a "no-fly zone" around their estate at Anmer Hall.

"They want both children to be free to play in public and semi-public spaces with other children without being photographed," a statement from the palace said.